Carsey School for Public Policy

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Middle and high schoolers in Coös County have a strong sense of community, but higher rates of depression than their peers in southern New Hampshire. That's according to a study released Monday by the Carsey School of Public Policy at UNH.

 In 2008,  researchers began surveying hundreds of young people in the North Country. With help from local school districts and social media, they tracked as many as they could through graduation and early adulthood.

Courtesy UNH

A new report out from UNH's Carsey School of Public Policy highlights the issue of child food insecurity in New Hampshire.

To be food insecure means that a child's household goes without access to healthy meals for a portion of the year. It points to data which show that in 2016, Coos County had the state's highest rate of child food insecurity at almost 18 percent.

Courtesy photo

UNH announced today it will take over publication of a widely referenced research publication.

 

"What is New Hampshire?" was previously produced by the now defunct Center for Public Policy Studies.

A new study from the UNH Carsey School of Public Policy finds that the number of children removed from parents has increased by 50 percent from 2012 to 2016.

Cases that included a substance use allegation doubled in that time period, from 30 percent to 60 percent.

Kristin Smith is the family demographer at the Carsey School. That removal from parental care can be stressful for children, and those whose parents use substances face challenges. 

UNH Carsey School

New Hampshire Public Radio kicked off a news series, The Balance, last weekIt looks at the costs, benefits and tradeoffs of life in New Hampshire, including why people move to -- or out of -- the state. Last year, New Hampshire saw its biggest population increase since before the Great Recession. Here to talk about what's behind that trend, is Ken Johnson, senior demographer with UNH's Carsey School.