Morning Edition | New Hampshire Public Radio

Morning Edition

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

More information is available at the Morning Edition website found here.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

There are protests in Thailand's capital today. Anti-government demonstrators in Bangkok are demanding the country's prime minister step down.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTER: (Non-English language spoken).

Like a lot of other 12-year-olds, Caleb Anderson of Marietta, Ga., loves outer space.

"I'm fascinated that there's another world beyond ours. There's another place. There's a better place," he tells NPR.

But unlike most kids his age, he's a sophomore in college, where he's studying calculus, U.S. history, humanities and macroeconomics.

He wants to be an aerospace engineer.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

If Latinos vote in large numbers, they could impact who wins this year's elections, but this is a group that typically has low voter turnout. And this year, there are new obstacles in their way. Here's NPR's Leila Fadel.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Coronavirus cases are surging in at least 30 states. They're growing at a rate higher than we have seen since midsummer, and hospitalizations are rising, too. NPR's Allison Aubrey is with us now to track all this. Good morning, Allison.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The World Series starts tomorrow night, and the stage is set. It'll be the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Tampa Bay Rays. The series will wind down the most unusual of baseball seasons here in the U.S. and cap off a most unusual stretch for one sportscaster. NPR's Andrea Hsu has the story.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: All right. We continue to follow breaking news here.

ANDREA HSU, BYLINE: Let's go back to March 12.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2020 Boise State Public Radio News. To see more, visit Boise State Public Radio News.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER")

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

During the 1918 flu pandemic, Blanche Reeves was living in rural Iowa when she got sick. Even though she was still recovering in November 1920, she managed to cast her vote in the presidential election.

Her determination to exercise her vote continues to inspire Blanche's daughter, Helen Merrill, a century later. In a remote StoryCorps conversation last week, Helen, now 91, told her granddaughter, Elizabeth Hartley, 27, how voting has become a "sacred thing" for her.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Every year, spending on political ads goes up. This presidential election, it's expected to top $1 billion. Keith Romer from our Planet Money podcast has been wondering what it's like to be on the receiving end of all that cash.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Two presidential candidates in simultaneous town hall meetings offered starkly different approaches to governing.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Updated at 1 pm, to include comment from the White House and the Department of Health and Human Services

Even the most effective, safest coronavirus vaccine won't work to curb the spread of the virus unless a large number of people get immunized. And getting a vaccine from the manufacturers all the way into people's arms requires complex logistics — and will take many months.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Schools aren't virus superspreaders - that was the conclusion of a recent study out of Brown University. Economist Emily Oster led that research, and I asked her to explain the data that makes her so sure.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

On this day in 1995, hundreds of thousands of black men gathered on the National Mall for the Million Man March. Here's what Wade Hudson saw.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The 2000 film Requiem for a Dream celebrates its 20th anniversary this fall, and in that time there's at least one part of its legacy that's never faded: the music. The movie's haunted original score spawned a kind of breakout hit that would ripple through media for years to come, while also kickstarting a new career for its British-born composer, Clint Mansell.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

(SOUNDBITE OF JOHN WILLIAMS' "'JAWS' MAIN TITLE")

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Pages