Eyder Peralta | New Hampshire Public Radio

Eyder Peralta

Eyder Peralta is NPR's East Africa correspondent based in Nairobi, Kenya.

He is responsible for covering the region's people, politics, and culture. In a region that vast, that means Peralta has hung out with nomadic herders in northern Kenya, witnessed a historic transfer of power in Angola, ended up in a South Sudanese prison, and covered the twists and turns of Kenya's 2017 presidential elections.

Previously, he covered breaking news for NPR, where he covered everything from natural disasters to the national debates on policing and immigration.

Peralta joined NPR in 2008 as an associate producer. Previously, he worked as a features reporter for the Houston Chronicle and a pop music critic for the Florida Times-Union in Jacksonville, FL.

Through his journalism career, he has reported from more than a dozen countries and he was part of the NPR teams awarded the George Foster Peabody in 2009 and 2014. His 2016 investigative feature on the death of Philando Castile was honored by the National Association of Black Journalists and the Society for News Design.

Peralta was born amid a civil war in Matagalpa, Nicaragua. His parents fled when he was a kid, and the family settled in Miami. He's a graduate of Florida International University.

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Finally today, so you might not be surprised that a record titled "Preacher's Kid" by a musician whose father was a pastor would take the top spot on the iTunes Christian album chart. That happened last month with the new album by Grace Semler Baldrige, who performs as Semler. But the lyrics on that album tell a different story than the one you might be expecting.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "JESUS FROM TEXAS")

SEMLER: (Singing) My mom turned 18 in the 1960s, and she doesn't remember Stonewall.

An activist in Uganda, who has fought an authoritarian government with vulgar poetry, is now in exile. Fleeing a broad crackdown against the opposition in the country.

In 2001, Maurine Murenga was pregnant and HIV-positive. She was living in Kenya, and a counselor encouraged her to fill out a memory book. She wrote directions to her village, details about her family so that when she died, someone would know where to bury her and where to send her child.

"It was nothing like preparing," says Murenga. "It was actually preparing us for death."

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Almost 50,000 Ethiopians have crossed into neighboring Sudan to escape a war. They are telling stories of brutal violence and facing dire conditions at the camps they're living in. NPR's Eyder Peralta reports.

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Just a year ago, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, but now a country with decades of battle scars is in conflict once again. NPR's Eyder Peralta reports on how a Nobel laureate became a belligerent.

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Nigerian security forces opened fire on protesters tonight in Lagos.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: Everyone, sit down. Sit down. Sit down.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNFIRE)

This past Sunday at Uhuru Park in downtown Nairobi, it was life as usual.

Kids took rides on horses and camels. Families and lovers shared paddle boats in the lake at the center of the park.

Alice Nyambura and Lucy Wahu, both college sophomores, sat on the grass watching the boats. The sun was shining; the lily pads blooming. They had come here to get their minds off the pandemic.

"I don't think there is anything like corona," Nyambura said.

"It is there," Wahu corrected her. "But I think they are exaggerating the numbers."

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Amid all the other news we're covering, we have news of a baby boom of elephants. Amboseli National Park in Kenya has welcomed at least 170 new elephant babies this year. Think of the baby showers. NPR's Eyder Peralta reports.

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