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Morning Edition

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

More information is available at the Morning Edition website found here.

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How Rhode Island Is Handling Vaccine Rollout

2 hours ago

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

We've heard a lot about how hard it's been for restaurants to stay open during the pandemic. But what we often don't hear is that closing can be just as tough.

U.S. Launches Military Airstrikes Against Syria

2 hours ago

The U.S. launched an air attack in Syria Thursday. Pentagon officials say they targeted facilities used by Iranian-backed militias responsible for a deadly rocket attack on a U.S. base in Iraq.

Some people in Texas have been shocked by the high bills they received after last week's power outages. But even families who haven't seen high bills may wind up paying for this crisis over time.

A 22-year-old Kansas City artist, Kearra Johnson, transforms a school art project into a tribute to Black history – a standard playing card deck with face cards that portray African American icons.

A bitter fight is being waged between tech giant rivals Facebook and Apple.

The showdown centers on the iPhone data of millions, highlighting a key battle over the future of how iPhone habits are tracked by third parties.

Facebook on Wednesday further escalated its public relations assault against Apple by unveiling a video voiced by Grace Jones aimed at currying the public's favor in its war with Apple.

In 1995, 14-year-old Tony Hicks got involved with a gang in Southern California. One night, as he and fellow gang members attempted to rob a pizza delivery driver, Tony shot and killed him.

That driver was Tariq Khamisa, a 20-year-old student at San Diego State University.

Tony became the youngest person in California to be charged as an adult. He served the majority of his sentence in maximum security prisons before he was released in 2019.

It was in the prison's visiting room where, a few years into his sentence, he first met Tariq's father, Azim Khamisa.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Our next guest has some issues with the Biden administration relief package. Congresswoman Nancy Mace is a freshman Republican from South Carolina. And she's on the line with us. Congresswoman, thanks so much for being here.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Drew Garza welcomed the Biden White House lifting a ban on transgender recruits. But Garza and other would-be transgender recruits are waiting for the formal requirements and rules for their service.

The massive failure of the Texas energy system has spurred a blame game and fresh calls for reform. Texas lawmakers are debating what went wrong, and how to keep it from happening again.

There are many parenting books out there. But NPR's Michaeleen Doucleff says all the parenting books that she read after becoming a mom left a lot out.

"I'm trained as a scientist. I spent seven years as a chemist and I really believed that the parenting advice we got today was backed by really stringent scientific research," she says. "And when I started looking at the studies as a scientist, I was really, really let down."

She couldn't find answers to the trouble that she was having with her young daughter, Rosy.

More than 500,000 Americans have died of COVID-19. Dan Hunt remembers his grandfather Joseph Karszen with the song "The Impossible Dream" from the musical Man of La Mancha.

Scientists have spotted yet another potentially worrisome coronavirus variant, a strain that has a mutation that may help it evade vaccines, and seems to be spreading fast in New York City.

When you think of the history of Black education in the United States, you might think of Brown vs. Board of Education and the fight to integrate public schools. But there's a parallel history too, of Black people pooling their resources to educate and empower themselves independently.

Enslaved people learned to read and write whenever and wherever they could, often in secret and against the law. "In accomplishing
this, I was compelled
 to resort to
various
 stratagems," like convincing white children to help him, wrote Frederick Douglass. "I had
no regular 
teacher."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Farming has destroyed a lot of the rich soil of America's Midwestern prairie. A team of scientists just came up with a staggering new estimate for just how much has disappeared.

The most fertile topsoil is entirely gone from a third of all the land devoted to growing crops across the upper Midwest, the scientists say. Some of their colleagues, however, remain skeptical about the methods that produced this result.

It's a simple fact. Black and brown families are more likely to be evicted than white ones. There are many reasons for this, but the pandemic has made matters worse and could widen the gap for years to come.

Aniya is a case in point. She's a mother of two, unemployed, struggling to get by. By the end of this month, she has to leave her two-bedroom apartment in Richmond, VA., and find a new place to live. This comes on top of an already tough 2020. We agreed not to use Aniya's full name because of possible repercussions on her ability to find another place to live.

NPR's Noel King talks to Sen. Amy Klobuchar, the chair of the rules committee, which co-sponsored the first joint hearing concerning security during the Capitol insurrection on Jan. 6.

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