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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

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Steve and I are in two of the many cities where people protested over the weekend. The demonstrations started here in Minneapolis where George Floyd died in police custody.

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Robin Rokobauer doesn't like to chance it. When there's a hurricane, she almost always evacuates.

Rokobauer lives in Cocoa Beach, Fla., on a barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean and the 153-mile-long Indian River Lagoon. Her mother is 93.

"She's got to have flushing toilets," Rokobauer says of her mother. "She's got to have fresh water. She's just got some physical needs that require that."

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CDC

Governor Chris Sununu has established a new task force that will recommend a plan to address the disproportionate effects of COVID-19 on communities of color in New Hampshire.

According to the most recent data from the state, black and Latino residents are testing positive at higher rates than their share of the population. That follows national trends on who’s been most affected by the virus.

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Columbia, Brown, Penn, Purdue — universities with hallowed traditions, proud alumni and another thing in common: Right now they're being sued by disgruntled students.

The students claim that when campuses shut down amid the coronavirus pandemic, they should have been entitled to more of their money back. And the list of institutions facing such challenges is growing, including private institutions and entire public systems in California, Florida, North Carolina and Arizona.

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Last week, we listened to workers who are packing boxes of food at the Capital Area Food Bank in Washington, D.C. Radha Muthiah, the food bank president, described volunteers at a conveyor belt.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED NPR BROADCAST)

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Music students in northeastern Pennsylvania are turning their streets into concert halls.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ALL MY LOVING")

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: (Singing) Close your eyes and I'll kiss you. Tomorrow, I'll miss you.

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Demonstrators brought traffic to a halt in south Minneapolis after a black man was killed in police custody on Monday night.

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Tens of millions of people are out of work because of the coronavirus. But if they apply for unemployment, they get $600 a week, which is more than some were making in their previous jobs. That was a deliberate effort by Congress to cushion the economic fallout from the pandemic, but now those benefits are getting a second look. Here's NPR chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley.

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Good morning. I'm David Greene. Members of an Oklahoma church found inspiration in their kitchens during a Zoom call to recreate a song for our times. It started with appliances opening and closing.

(SOUNDBITE OF BANGING KITCHEN APPLIANCES)

On a Tuesday morning in Albany, Ga., Cathy Cody is walking through the empty hallways of a home left vacant by COVID-19.

"Right now, I'm standing in a home we started on, packing up their loved one's belongings because that's all they have left," Cody says during a Facebook Live video.

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