Morning Edition | New Hampshire Public Radio

Morning Edition

Morning Edition, it's a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Edition. Hosts Renée Montagne and Steve Inskeep bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. The range of coverage includes reports on the Supreme Court from Nina Totenberg; education from Claudio Sanchez; health coverage from Joanne Silberner; and the latest on national security from Tom Gjelten. Steve and Renee interview newsmakers: from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers. In-depth stories explore topics like "digital generations" about the effect of technology on the way we live; special series delve into the intersection of science and art, and find untold stories of the country's Hidden Kitchens.

More information is available at the Morning Edition website found here.

NPR's Steve Inskeep talks to Ambassador Susan Rice about whether she'd like to be vice president, how the U.S. should recover from COVID-19, and what happens when she and her son disagree on politics.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

For most public officials, battling the coronavirus and keeping their constituents safe is an incredible professional challenge.

For Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia, it's also personal: His mother died of COVID-19 complications last month at age 61.

The pandemic has revealed how dependent Italians are on migrant farm workers. The new documentary, "Invisible," profiles a migrant champion as he raises the awareness of their plight.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

More Americans are expected to cast their ballots by mail in November's election than ever before. Is the U.S. Postal Service prepared? Postmaster General Louis DeJoy is in charge. He was appointed back in May saying this...

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The coronavirus outbreak has entered a new phase in this country. That's what Dr. Deborah Birx of the White House Coronavirus Task Force is saying now.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

The coronavirus outbreak, to put it bluntly, is getting worse in this country.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Here's what White House Coronavirus Task Force coordinator Dr. Deborah Birx told CNN yesterday.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 KTEP. To see more, visit KTEP.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Today marks a year since a mass shooting at an El Paso Walmart killed 23 people. Today, Angela Kocherga of member station KTEP brings us the story of one man and the woman who saved his life that day.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Robina Asti has lived much of her life in the sky.

ROBINA ASTI: Did you ever see a completely rainbow? It's a complete circle.

MARTIN: She's a pilot with stories from all over the world.

Copyright 2020 KJZZ. To see more, visit KJZZ.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Alexea Gaffney battles health issues every day on multiple fronts. As an infectious disease doctor in Stony Brook, N.Y., she treats patients who have COVID-19. And two years ago, at age 37, she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer.

As a result, the physician and single mom, who is also home-schooling her 8-year-old daughter these days, is still under medical treatment for the cancer. And that makes her more vulnerable to the virus.

It's no exaggeration to say this year feels like a horror movie. And now, a few filmmakers are making it official.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We know…we’ve been remiss, and it’s time to talk about the elephant in the room. Something Wild, as you know, is a chance to take a closer look at the wildlife, ecosystems and marvelous phenomena you can find in and around New Hampshire. But over the years there is one species in New Hampshire that we haven’t spent much time examining. A species, I think that has been conspicuous in its absence. Humans.

Courtesy of Nicole McKenzie

Federal workers and local volunteers are trying to get as many people as possible in New Hampshire to fill out to 2020 U.S. census. Time is running out for the first part of that process, which is focused on getting people to fill out the survey themselves before a census worker shows up at their door in August.

NHPR's Sarah Gibson has been checking in with census workers. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with her about how it's going in the Granite State.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Pages