Jack Rodolico | New Hampshire Public Radio

Jack Rodolico

Senior Producer/Reporter, Podcasts & Special Projects

Jack has spent his career in public radio and podcasting producing narrative-driven investigative journalism that delivers an emotional impact. He is the recipient of more than a dozen local and national awards, including a National Edward R. Murrow Award and finalist nods from the Scripps Howard Foundation and the Dart Award for Excellence in Coverage of Trauma.

Jack was the lead reporter on “A Mountain of Misconduct” and “Heroin Diaries”, both collaborations with Reveal from the Center for Investigative Reporting. He was senior reporter on “Last Seen”, a podcast from WBUR and The Boston Globe about the greatest art heist in history.

He has covered opioid addiction for National Public Radio and he reported and produced “Monumental Dilemma” for 99% Invisible, a story about the racist origins of the oldest monument dedicated to a woman in the United States.

David Wilson/Imelda via Flickr CC

As with other health markers, N.H. consistently ranks high in measures of youth dental health and, overall, the state of children's teeth in New Hampshire is strong.

But in some of the state's least affluent areas, health outcomes are generally poor, and dental health is no exception. 

Jack Rodolico

You probably never would have guessed it, but one of the front lines of public health in New Hampshire is on the second floor of an elementary school in Claremont - in a storage closet. Here a dental hygienist meets with a second grade girl to talk teeth.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Tick season is back, and so is another year of mostly preventable cases of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases.

While blacklegged ticks – also called deer ticks – will be active until the fall, from now until July is when the nymphs, or young ones, are most active. Nymphs are tiny and hard to find, which makes the risk to contract Lyme, babesiosis and anaplasmosis highest starting right now.

But more dangerous than the diseases themselves, says Alan Eaton, an entomologist with UNH, is the lack of public awareness about these illnesses.

loveiswritten via Flickr Creative Commons

State officials say New Hampshire faces a critical shortage of foster families for a growing number of children.

About 1,000 kids will enter the public system this year, yet there are only 600 licensed foster homes, and many of those are not prepared to take in a child at this time.

Michelle Galligan with Child and Family Services in Manchester says the state is particularly struggling to find homes for sibling groups, sometimes with up to four children at a time. And the problem has gotten worse in recent years.

Conway Daily Sun/Jamie Gemmiti

Lakeview Neurorehabilitation Center in Effingham is appealing the state’s decision to revoke its special education license. The facility is currently under heavy scrutiny by state regulators for abuse and neglect of people with disabilities and brain injuries.

Lakeview has also hired a new executive director, who was formerly an employee for New Hampshire’s Department of Health and Human Services. And Lakeview has hired a new director of special education as it appeals the state’s decision to revoke its license.

Jack Rodolico

Healthcare reform has brought lots of changes, but here’s what hasn’t changed: healthcare is still expensive, and the price tag is still rising.

Mark Galvin founded of a string of tech companies on the Seacoast. And he says one thing has dampened all their prospects: the crushing cost of healthcare.

"Every time I went to start a new company, it went from being kind of a nonissue, to a little bit of an issue, to a bigger issue, to a giant issue," says Galvin.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

A study out of Dartmouth suggests New Hampshire is making good progress in the fight against prostate cancer.

New Hampshire doctors are increasingly doing what the medical community recommends: treating high-risk prostate cancer with surgery and radiation, but leaving low-risk cancer alone, and simply monitoring it.

DavidWilson1949 via Flickr Creative Commons

The Senate Finance Committee will consider funding for the Department of Health and Human Services on Monday.

The Senate will take up the House budget, which ends funding for the state’s expanded Medicaid program, suspends ServiceLink - which connects elderly and disabled residents with funding and services - and delays a 10-bed mental health crisis unit at New Hampshire Hospital by one year.

While the House budget increased the Health and Human Services budget $110 million over the previous year, it fell $200 million short of Governor Hassan’s proposed budget.

Jack Rodolico

There’s an upside and a downside to being an independent massage therapist.

Upside: no boss. You work for yourself. Downside: no boss. There’s no employer to provide health insurance.

"So then the Affordable Care Act was coming around," says Rachelle Lowe, a masseuse in Concord, "what I found was it wasn’t as affordable as I thought. And the deductibles are outrageous, so at this time I’m still not insured."

Courtesy the Conway Daily Sun/Jamie Gemmiti

New reports commissioned by Governor Maggie Hassan have found state regulators failed to protect residents from abuse and neglect at Lakeview Neurorehabilitation Center in Effingham.

The reports come as the Department of Education - after repeated attempts to push Lakeview into compliance with state regulations - announces it will shut down the Lakeview School. 

The state will now reevaluate how it regulates the facility’s residential program.

Thomas Fearon

The Manchester VA Hospital must pay $21 million in a medical malpractice lawsuit. 

According to the federal judge who heard the case, a 60-year-old veteran in Bennington suffered a horrific ordeal that left him trapped inside his own body – and the event was entirely preventable.

After Michael Farley suffered a stroke in 2010, VA doctors failed to give him the proper medications to prevent a second stroke.  Medical staff also poorly coordinated Farley's care.

U.S. Attorney's Office, District of N.H.

Two New Hampshire men have pleaded guilty to trafficking a huge amount of synthetic cannabis, also called spice, valued at about $4 million.

One year ago, undercover officers traced spice being sold in convenience stores in Hooksett and Londonderry back to two men producing the stuff at three locations in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Officers found 3,000 pounds of spice, scales, boxes of empty packages, and residue of a controlled substance called AB-FUBINACA.

After pleading guilty, defendants Kyle Hurley, 32, and Robert Costello, 71, could face decades in prison.

Twitter

Hackers took credit for briefly taking down government-run websites in New Hampshire and Maine today.

An attack on the third-party server that hosts Visit N-H.gov and Maine.gov brought the websites down for about an hour this morning. A self-described “hacking crew” called Vikingdom2015 took credit for it on Twitter.

Child and Family Services

As the temperature dips below freezing tonight, activists and business leaders will sleep outside in Manchester’s Stanton Park to raise money and awareness for youth homelessness.

The timing is no coincidence. Manchester’s daytime homeless shelter recently slashed its hours due to lack of funding. The city is also considering a panhandling ban.

Cathy Schmidt, CEO of McLane Law Firm, says her headlamp and sleeping bag are packed.

The Department of Health and Human Services is offering a free blood test to people who may have drunk contaminated water at the Pease Tradeport in Portsmouth last year.

Perfluorochemicals, or PFCs, are used in products that resist heat – like Teflon, and the foam once used for fighting fires at Pease Airforce Base. PFCs were found in a well at the Pease Tradeport in May 2014.

Conway Daily Sun/Jamie Gemmiti

Late last month, the New Hampshire Department of Education made an unannounced visit to Lakeview School in Effingham. DOE had placed the special education school on provisional approval last November, and February 26 marked the third – though the only unannounced – visit to Lakeview since the fall.

The Obama Administration has opened a special enrollment period for health insurance through the federal exchange.

The federal government is betting people who did not sign up for insurance last year are now noticing they will be paying a penalty on their 2014 taxes, which are due next month.

So the hope is by opening up a special enrollment period, those same folks will buy policies so they will not have another penalty on their 2015 taxes.

Darren via Flickr CC

New Hampshire is receiving an $8.6 million grant to provide rental assistance for people with mental illness.

The grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development will help cover rent for up 150 individuals or families with mental illness.

Dean Christon is the director of the New Hampshire Housing Finance Authority.

Allegra Boverman

The house voted Thursday to repeal a law that created buffer zones for protestors around health clinics that provide abortions.

In recent years, both New Hampshire and Massachusetts passed such laws. But last year, the Supreme Court overturned the Massachusetts law, and New Hampshire’s law is yet to be enforced.

Before the new bill passed be a 170-159 margin, Republican Representative Joseph Hagan of Chester said the existing bill steps on free-speech rights.

The Senate has voted to wait before deciding whether to extend the state’s expanded Medicaid program, also called the New Hampshire Health Protection Program.

Under the law that went into effect last year, the program will expire at the end of 2016. That’s the point when the federal government stops funding the entire expansion, dialing its contribution down to 90 percent.

In a bipartisan vote, the Senate tabled the extension in order to give more time to determine how the program is working.

In 2015, about 25 percent more New Hampshire residents bought insurance on the federal healthcare marketplace than the year before.

Officials with the Department of Health and Human Services said 53,005 people enrolled in plans in New Hampshire. The department also reports just over 50 percent of those enrollees were under the age of 35 – a target demographic for health reform advocates. 

2015 HealthCare.gov Enrollees By Type: New Hampshire

Click the bubbles above the chart to see the breakdown of re-enrollees by type:

Jack Rodolico

The Grafton County Superior Court has ruled against a last-ditch effort by supporters of the Free State Project to alter a ballot the day before an election.

Free State Supporters in the Town of Grafton managed to get 20 warrant articles onto the local ballot this year - including efforts to stop tax money from flowing to the local library and banning the town from cooperating with the National Security Agency.

 An insurance company and a group of medical providers are teaming up to start a new insurance company in New Hampshire.

The new company is a partnership between Massachusetts-based Tufts Health Plan and Granite Healthcare Network – the parent company for Catholic Medical Center, Concord Hospital, Wentworth-Douglas Hospital, LRGHealthcare, and Southern New Hampshire Health System.

Tufts Health Freedom Plan will begin selling insurance to employers. The company is considering selling in the individual market too, including on the federal healthcare exchange.

Conway Daily Sun/Jamie Gemmiti

Yesterday, NHPR reported on abuse and neglect of people with disabilities at Lakeview Neurorehabilitation Center in Effingham. This story is the second in a two-part series on Lakeview.

Since October 2014, the Department of Education has found major deficiencies in virtually every aspect of the Lakeview School, one of the most expensive state-certified special education programs in New Hampshire. As a result, the school is on "provisional approval."

As of January 26 2015, Lakeview had not complied with the following deficiency findings:

Photos of Ryan's injuries were taken by Cote and published by NHPR with her permission

Since last September, Lakeview Neurorehabilitation Center in Effingham has been under scrutiny for abusing and neglecting some of the people it cares for – children and adults with brain injuries and developmental disabilities. NHPR has been looking into these accusations, and it turns out the state had warning signs about Lakeview going back to at least 2011.

This is the first of two stories on Lakeview, a look at the scope of those accusations. 

Following are many of the source documents and related media used in NHPR's reporting on the Lakeview Neurorehabilitation Center in Effingham, N.H. 

Visit our Flickr album to see photos of Jennifer Cote and her son Ryan Libbey taken by Greta Rybus for NHPR.

via WUKY

  Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield now says 667,866 people in New Hampshire are affected by a recent data hack, or about half the state.  That figure includes former Anthem members.

Last month, Anthem revealed hackers tapped into a national database with the personal information of 80 million people.

Conway Daily Sun/Jamie Gemmiti

The state has accepted a Plan of Correction from Lakeview Neurorehabilitation Center in Effingham, which means, for now, Lakeview’s doors wills stay open.

Last September the Disability Rights Center released two reports alleging many instances of neglect and abuse at Lakeview, and at that time Governor Maggie Hassan shut down new admissions to the facility. Lakeview cares for people with developmental disabilities and traumatic brain injuries.

NHPR’s Jack Rodolico discussed what's next for Lakeview on All Things Considered.

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