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The Future Of The U.S. Immigrant Population, In 1 Graphic

Jihye Jang of Korea participates in a naturalization ceremony at the Chicago Cultural Center on July 3, 2013, in Chicago.
Scott Olson
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Getty Images
Jihye Jang of Korea participates in a naturalization ceremony at the Chicago Cultural Center on July 3, 2013, in Chicago.

Here's something you probably knew: Asians have become the fastest-growing minority in this country.

Today, the Pew Research Center released a new analysis that shows that by 2055, Asians will pass Latinos as the largest immigrant group in the country.

Here's a graphic that shows past, present and projected future pivots in the country's immigrant population:

Of course these numbers will translate into a country that looks very different from what it looks like now. Here's a paragraph from the Pew report that summarizes the effect on the overall population:

"Non-Hispanic whites are projected to become less than half of the U.S. population by 2055 and 46% by 2065. No racial or ethnic group will constitute a majority of the U.S. population. Meanwhile, Hispanics will see their population share rise to 24% by 2065 from 18% today, while Asians will see their share rise to 14% by 2065 from 6% today."

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Eyder Peralta is NPR's East Africa correspondent based in Nairobi, Kenya.

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