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A Media Report Card On The Flint Water Crisis

Tears stream down the face of Morgan Walker, age 5 of Flint, as she gets her finger pricked for a lead screening on January 26, 2016 at Eisenhower Elementary School in Flint, Michigan. Free lead screenings are performed for Flint children 6 years old and younger, one of several events sponsored by Molina Healthcare following the city's water contamination and federal state of emergency. (Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)
Tears stream down the face of Morgan Walker, age 5 of Flint, as she gets her finger pricked for a lead screening on January 26, 2016 at Eisenhower Elementary School in Flint, Michigan. Free lead screenings are performed for Flint children 6 years old and younger, one of several events sponsored by Molina Healthcare following the city's water contamination and federal state of emergency. (Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)

The water quality in Flint, Michigan, was an issue long before the national news media got to the story. Now many are asking, “What took so long?”

The New York Times’ public editor Margaret Sullivan wrote that its reporters should have done “some serious digging” after its first story on Flint’s water problems back in March.

NPR Media Correspondent David Folkenflik speaks with Here & Now’s Robin Young about his observations on the media coverage of Flint’s water crisis.

Guest

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