2018 Elections

Credit Sara Plourde for NHPR

Click each race below for NHPR's coverage:

Governor's Race  |  State Senate Races

Congressional District 1  |  Congressional District 2

All Election Coverage

Click here for our voter's guide and a map of N.H. polling places. Click here for a version in Spanish.

Click here for real-time results after the polls close.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

When there is national news about recounts—ahem, Florida—New Hampshire tends to see an increase in such requests. In 2000, the year of Florida's hanging chads, the Granite State had 28. This year, there are 20.

And Secretary of State Bill Gardner says that’s a typical number after an election, and

the state’s paper ballots are recounted by hand.

Facebook Ad Archive

The final weeks of last week’s midterm campaign saw a flurry of partisan activity: Last-minute Facebook ads touting Gov. Chris Sununu’s plan for paid family and medical leave. Fliers criticizing Republican lawmakers “who cozy up to big corporations and special interests.” Phone banks backed by a group called "Families First," encouraging voters to support Democrats on Election Day.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: November 9, 2018

Nov 9, 2018

The so-called "blue wave" flipped the New Hampshire legislature and Executive Council to Democrat - we look at what's ahead after Tuesday's midterm elections, and the impact of increasing diversity at the N.H. statehouse. We also look at midterm results in neighboring states plus some non-election New Hampshire news.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

State attorneys fielded 185 calls to their Election Day hotline this week — ranging from traffic complaints to registration questions to problems with voting equipment — but most complaints were resolved without the need for any formal investigation.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Increases in voter turnout were particularly high Tuesday in areas around New Hampshire's college campuses.

More than 50 percent more ballots were cast this year in Durham, as well as in Keene's first ward, as compared to the last midterm election in 2014.

Those precincts are home to the University of New Hampshire and Keene State College, respectively. 

Overall, turnout was up about 17 percent statewide.

[Midterms: Complete New Hampshire election results]

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Last session, in a body of 400, there were just 23 state representatives under the age of 35.

But Democrats and Republicans who pay attention to the demographics of the State House say the next legislative session will see a boost in younger folks, including 42 representatives under the age of 40.

NHPR File Photo

Next year, Republican Governor Chris Sununu will be working with a Democratic majority in the legislature and on the Executive Council. 

The last time the five-member council was majority Democrat was in 2014.

The Council reviews the Governor's hiring decisions and approves state contracts.

Historically, it has been seen as non-partisan, but in recent years it has become more political - with fights over Planned Parenthood, light rail, and staffing appointments.

Bethlehem Reimagined on Facebook

In about half of New Hampshire polling places, votes are still tallied up by hand. And that was the case in Bethlehem until Tuesday night — when a new ballot counting device made its debut, thanks to a community fundraising campaign.

Tom Roy / Union Leader

While voters chose to reelect Gov. Chris Sununu on Tuesday, they also voted to put both chambers of the state Legislature and the Executive Council in the hands of Democrats, reversing the State House's current balance of power.  These changes will test the governor, which he acknowledged during his victory speech.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Tuesday's election results handed Democrats control of both chambers of the New Hampshire Legislature for the first time in nearly a decade. With Republican Gov. Chris Sununu winning a second term, the stage is set for divided government in Concord for the next two years.

In the Senate, Democrats overcame an unfavorable map to flip several Republican-held seats and take a 14-10 majority.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire’s senior U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen says she’s hoping for more bipartisanship in Congress, with a new Democratic majority in the House of Representatives.

Shaheen was at an event in Portsmouth Wednesday and spoke to NHPR about the mixed midterm results.

While Democrats took back the House of Representatives, Republicans expanded their majority in the Senate. Shaheen says it's a call for all of Congress to work across the aisle.

NHPR

New Hampshire’s Libertarian Party on Tuesday failed to earn enough votes to stay on the ballot in 2020.

In the governor’s race, candidate Jilletta Jarvis needed at least 4 percent of the vote to maintain the Libertarian’s major party status.

She won just 1.4 percent.

“I’m disappointed, obviously,” said Caleb Dyer, the party’s secretary. “I think we could have done better, and I think we should have."

Dyer lost his own seat in the New Hampshire House Tuesday. He ran as a Libertarian this year, instead of a Republican as he had in 2016.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Former New Hampshire Senate Minority Leader Jeff Woodburn has lost his reelection bid in the North Country.

The Whitefield Democrat was arrested in August on several domestic-assault-related charges. State Democratic leaders urged Woodburn to drop out of the race at the time, but he remained on the ballot, fighting off a write-in challenge in the Democratic primary.

Woodburn was first elected to the District One Senate seat in 2012. Republican David Starr of Franconia will now hold that seat.

Taylor Quimby for NHPR

The mid-term elections are over, and New Hampshire Republicans will hold onto the corner office, with Governor Sununu's victory. Meanwhile, Democrats celebrated holding onto the state's two congressional seats and Democrats now hold the balance of power in the state House, Senate and Executive Council.  

 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Democrat Chris Pappas beat Republican Eddie Edwards Tuesday in the race for New Hampshire's 1st Congressional District. The candidates were vying for the seat vacated by Democrat Carol Shea Porter.

Pappas' victory came after a hard-fought battle that began with two bitter primary campaigns and a general election that kept voters on edge until late on election night.

Tom Roy | The NH Union Leader

Governor Chris Sununu won second term in Concord on Tuesday. He beat Democrat Molly Kelly by racking up votes in GOP towns and holding steady or better in the state’s two largest cities.

But Sununu will now have to work with a state legislature and executive council under Democratic control.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Congresswoman Ann McLane Kuster cruised to a reelection victory Tuesday. Kuster won her fourth term in office in New Hampshire's 2nd Congressional District, beating Republican Steve Negron.

“Tonight the people of New Hampshire’s second congressional district sent a message loud and clear: they want a Granite State and they want a country where no one is left behind," Kuster told supporters at her headquarters in Concord.

Negron, in conceding the race, noted his appreciation for the respectful tone of the contest.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire voters have approved two changes to the state constitution Tuesday. The first amendment gives individual taxpayers the legal standing necessary to bring a lawsuit against the government if they believe public funds are being misused.

Click here to read the full text of both ballot questions.

Annie Ropeik for NHPR

While some voters packed campaign events and watch parties Tuesday night as election returns started to come in, others stayed a little further from the action.

NHPR’s Annie Ropeik talked to voters at a bar in Rochester and filed this report.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Some town and city clerks in New Hampshire are expecting big voter turnouts today because of the higher-than-average numbers of absentee ballots they've received.

They say the numbers are above what they usually see for midterm elections, and a bit below what they see during presidential elections, which is usually between 60 to 70 percent.

In Manchester, City Clerk Matthew Normand says absentee ballot numbers are the highest for a midterm in at least 35 years, if not ever.

Sam Evans-Brown for NHPR

Voters headed to the polls across New Hampshire Tuesday to vote in the midterm elections. Click here for all of NHPR's 2108 election coverage. Scroll down to read our real-time coverage of Election Day.

CLICK HERE FOR REAL-TIME RESULTS.

Your New Hampshire Voting Questions: Answered

Nov 6, 2018
Allegra Boverman; NHPR

Tuesday is midterm day, and there is still a lot of confusion surrounding who can vote, what you need to bring to the polls, and whether voting legislation like SB3 will impact you. We'll answer these questions on-air, and hear about Spanish-language resources for voters and a forum for transgender voters. 


Vox Efx / Flickr Creative Commons

New Hampshire voters will have the opportunity to decide next week whether to pass two amendments to the state constitution in the form of questions on the ballot.

The first ballot question would change taxpayer standing to bring legal actions against the government.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

The midterm elections might seem like a national event. But in reality, the election process is a decidedly local affair. That’s especially true in New Hampshire, where voting is run at the town level.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Some big-name supporters joined Congressional District 1 candidates Chris Pappas and Eddie Edwards on their final full day of campaigning. 

Former New Hampshire Governor John Lynch joined Democrat Chris Pappas on campaign stops at diners.

Lynch, a Democrat who served four terms in Concord, said voters want politicians to work across the aisle – and Pappas will do that.

Britta Greene / NHPR

In politics today, it seems like everyone’s choosing sides. That can be particularly tough in small towns, where personal opinions often enter the public sphere. Now, there’s increasingly hard divisions along party lines, even on local issues that have little to do with national debates.

To get at some of these tensions, NHPR stopped recently in rural communities across the Upper Valley. We talked to voters about how things have changed for them since the last election, and how they’re feeling now, on the eve of the midterms.

Volunteers from both parties are working to get high school and college-age voters to the polls on Tuesday.

High schools tend to host voter registration drives in the spring, when more seniors have turned eighteen, but some schools are making sure eligible high schoolers are ready to vote tomorrow.

Prescott Herzog, sophomore at Stevens High School in Claremont and president of High School Democrats of America, says his group of high school Democrats is working to ensure all 18-year olds at the school, regardless of their politics, head to the polls.

Lauren Chooljian for NHPR

The divisive 2018 midterm campaign is quickly drawing to a close.

Over the weekend - candidates and volunteers knocked on doors, shook hands - and in some cases went grocery shopping - as they tried to make their final get out the vote push.

NHPR’s Lauren Chooljian and Josh Rogers were also on the trail.

Tracy Lee Carroll, NHPR

New Hampshire voters will have the opportunity to decide next week whether to pass two amendments to the state constitution in the form of questions on the ballot.

The second ballot question addresses the individual right to privacy from the state in reference to personal information and data.

Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with UNH law professor John Greabe about what this change would mean for Granite Staters.

 

Jason Moon for NHPR

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders was among the political figures crisscrossing the state this weekend ahead of this week’s midterm elections.

On Sunday Sanders started with a rally at UNH then headed to Brookside Community Church in Manchester, where a packed house awaited him.

His speech touched on many familiar themes for the Independent senator, including single-payer healthcare, income inequality, and campaign finance reform. Sanders told the crowd that while some called his ideas radical during his run for president two years ago, public support is now on his side.

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