New Hampshire Department of Education

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

Lawmakers are holding up $10 million of a charter school grant from the federal government, citing concerns over how the grant will affect existing public schools and the state budget.

The money is part of $46-million grant made to the New Hampshire Department of Education, with the goal of doubling the number of charter schools in the state over the next five years.

The New Hampshire Department of Education is getting $46 million from the federal government to expand public charter schools over the next five years.

Dan Tuohy; NHPR

 

Shrinking student populations in northern Vermont and New Hampshire are prompting school officials from both states to consider an interstate district merger. 

SAU 7, which includes Colebrook, Clarksville, Pittsburg, and Stewartown, has lost 30% of its student population in the past decade. Across the Connecticut River in Canaan, the Essex North Supervisory Union has lost 40% of its students in the last fifteen years.

Michael Brindley for NHPR

 

The U.S. Department of Education is allowing New Hampshire to keep $10 million in unspent federal special education funds - called IDEA grants - but, it is requiring the N.H. education department to adjust how it sends these funds to towns in the future.

Special Education Funding In The Granite State

Feb 18, 2019

After news that New Hampshire had over $10 million in unspent federal funds for special education over the last ten years, we take a look at the dynamic balance of allocating resources for special education in the state, including changing student needs, workforce shortages, and the challenge of predicting and adapting to the ever-evolving student population within a school and within a district. We also look at why special education programs can vary widely with regards to resources across the state, and how that impacts students and educators. 

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

The State Board of Education is getting public feedback on proposed Learn Everywhere rules that would make it easier for students to get high school credit for extracurricular activities.

Education Commissioner Frank Edelblut helped develop Learn Everywhere in response to legislation passed in Spring 2018. 

N.H. Department of Education

New Hampshire has approved the state’s first new university in six years - and it’s not your typical college.

Signum University offers online classes on sci-fi and fantasy literature, with topics ranging from Anglo-Saxon language to J.R.R. Tolkien.

It currently has 85 students in the MA program. The students pay tuition per course, with each course costing $650.

The test results for New Hampshire schools are in: proficiency in Math and English Language Arts are above the national average in most districts, and science scores are on the rise.

According to the N.H. Department of Education's annual report on student performance in state assessments, 58 percent of students are proficient at English, and 48 percent proficient at math.

Courtesy of N.H. DOE

The New Hampshire Department of Education is partnering with the New Hampshire National Guard's Counter Drug Task Force to improve substance use prevention and intervention for students.

On Dec. 6th, the N.H. DOE and the National Guard signed a 9-year Memorandum of Understanding outlining the partnership.

This is the country's first such agreement between the two groups.