Jimmy Gutierrez

Producer + Reporter, Second Greatest Show on Earth|Outside/In

photo cred: Isabel Marroquin

Jimmy is a reporter + producer for NHPR's podcast's Second Greatest Show on Earth and Outside/In. He has produced work for Milwaukee Public Radio, WCAI, and Precious Lives, a podcast examining youth and gun violence.

Before making radio, he was a firefighter with the Milwaukee Fire Department as well as a community reporter in his home city.

Ways to Connect

Jimmy Gutierrez

Regardless of their formal sex education, teenagers at the beginning of their social and romantic lives often turn to each other for information. In the second episode of The Second Greatest Show on Earth’s series on sex ed in New Hampshire, we hear directly from teens about how they are navigating consent, porn, masculinity, and femininity.  

This is the second episode in our two-part series on sex education. Listen to the first installment here.

Allegra Boverman | NHPR

Thousands of people went to the polls yesterday to vote in New Hampshire's first in the nation primary.

Charles Cooper wasn't one of them.

In the past few months, many of the candidates running for the Democratic presidential nomination  have passed through the studios of New Hampshire Public Radio, on the top floor of an office building in Concord.

On their way to the elevator, they had to pass by the Pillsbury Cafe and Pantry, owned by Cooper and his wife Jill.

Sara Plourde / NHPR

As the country engages in conversations around sex, consent, and masculinity, The Second Greatest Show on Earth investigates questions about sex education in New Hampshire.

When Amy Dattner Levy moved to New Hampshire five years ago from New York City, she wasn’t thinking about transportation and how things were about to change. 

“One of the biggest changes for me is the dependency on a car,” said Dattner Levy.

Dattner Levy, who moved here with her husband, Rabbi Peter Levy, asked us to look into a question for her: 

“What are the greatest obstacles that keep New Hampshire from creating a) an inter-city bus system and b) a commuter rail that could connect into the commuter rail that goes into Boston?”

 

During our reporting, some conversations don't make the final cut because they don't quite fit the subject at hand – but it's often the meandering moment and quiet stories that bring a place to life. Here's a few too good not to share: we're calling them "Tiny Stories from the North Country."

Is the North Country moving towards an ATV-based economy? And if it is, what does that mean for residents who aren't sold on the idea? 

Honor or Omen?

May 10, 2019

Over 100 years ago, in 1909, Edwin Grozier, publisher of the Boston Post, had an idea for a publicity stunt. He would send out an ebony cane with a gold top, complete with inscription, to 700 New England towns. The cane was to be given out to the town's oldest male resident (the tradition has since included women). And after that resident passed, it would find its way into the hands of the next oldest resident. 

This is the fourth and final episode of “The Rules Are Different Here,” a four-part series on mass incarceration in New Hampshire. Listen to the full series here.

Annie Wrenn is middle-aged with blond hair she wears with bangs. She’s a little over 5 feet tall. And on first sight, you’d never guess she’s a prison guard.

History of Concord NH From the Original Grant in Seventeen Hundred and Twenty-Five to the Opening of the Twentieth Century

Bill Blanchard was just a kid when he first came into contact with law enforcement.

"Going Inside" is the first installment of a four-part series,"The Rules Are Different Here: A Series on New Hampshire's Prisons and Jails." The full series is available here.

History of Concord, New Hampshire, from the original grant in seventeen hundred and twenty-five to the opening of the twentieth century

What does mass incarceration look like in New Hampshire?

Tipped Off

Nov 17, 2018

When it comes to restaurants, most folks think about celebrity chefs, newly-opened spots or the latest food trends. But what do we know about the people that work within them? On today's show, we're looking inside the service industry, and specifically, the practice of tipping. And we'll try to answer the question: what type of culture does tipping create? 

A Game of Failures

Oct 12, 2018

In the Summer of 1946, the Nashua Dodgers did something no other professional baseball team had done in the U.S. in the twentieth century: they played ball with a racially integrated team.

Growing up is hard enough. Now imagine that very few people look like you - in your community, schools, and even your home. This can often be the world of transracial adoptees. These are kids adopted by families of a different race or ethnicity. On today's show we're exploring the complex conversations around these adoptions and hearing from adoptees of color. 

A Company Town

Aug 24, 2018

In the sleepy town of Pittsfield, New Hampshire you can find a global leader of manufacturing and technology right under your nose. On today's episode we're returning to our New Hampshire Firsts series with the company that invented firefighting turnout gear: Globe Manufacturing.

Full-time workers often spend more time with their colleagues than their families. So, what's the history of work in the U.S. What changes could be in store for the workweek?

And why can it feel so liberating to leave a terrible job? On today's show we'll look into all of those questions and more. 

Border/State

Jul 13, 2018
Robert Garrova

Conversations around immigration have become a hot-button issues once again, not just in national rhetoric, but here in the Granite State. On today's show we'll hear of one family's vacation that came to a screeching halt on I-93, what an open borders policy could look like, and we'll hear about the sport that transcends borders.  

  •   Plus a conversation with Milford grad and Seattle Reign FC's Morgan Andrews
  • A Father-Daughter bond with deep love of country and soccer 

In today's episode, we're talking about getting in too deep and surviving. First, storm chasing burst onto the pop-culture scene in the 90s with the box-office hit Twister. But the hobby is more active today than ever before and more dangerous, too. And then, the business that can helicopter, air-lift and rescue their clients from dangerous adventures and vacations - for the right price. 

Grassroots

Jun 15, 2018

Over the past five years, New Hampshire's cannabis legislation has gone from non-existent to possible all-out legalization. But among neighboring states, New Hampshire still lags behind. On today's show we're answering an #OnlyinNH question that asks, "why, when compared to other New England states, is New Hampshire so conservative on cannabis legislation?" And then a different kind of high - we head to the mountains to see who's hiking and smoking?   

Jimmy Gutierrez for NHPR

In our continuing series Only in New Hampshire, we answer listener questions about oddities of the Granite State and its communities.

For this story, we fielded one from Karen Rosenberg: What is the origin of Cat Alley in Manchester?"

While April is National Poetry Month, it's also the time of year when some people whisper among themselves that the form is "really not for me". On this week's show we'll ask a couple of local wordsmiths how to make poetry more accessible.

And, as the ghost of William Shakespeare enjoys renewed interest every April, one local man gets down to brass tacks - was Shakespeare a plagiarist?

Chris Jensen for NHPR

For the latest in our series Only in New Hampshire, in which we answer listener questions about the Granite State, we looked into this question, submitted by Amanda:

What percentage of New Hampshire businesses are cooperatives?

But before we dig into the numbers, we needed a clear answer on what exactly a cooperative is.

A lot of people hear "cooperative business" and think of their local food co-ops. But, the co-op model isn't limited to bulk bins of quinoa - it was designed to share profits with workers and give small businesses leverage against megastores.

So, what role do they play in the Granite State? 

Plus, we'll hear from area high school students, in this post-Parkland moment, who are organizing to tell lawmakers: Never Again. 

If you're looking for a slice in New Hampshire, you can find a House of Pizza in just about every town in the state. These pies are pan baked, with a hard crust that works like a retaining wall for an even layer of sauce and cheese. This is Greek pizza. And if New Hampshire's got a signature 'za, this is it.

But why are all of these Greek pizza joints called "House of Pizza"? And how did Greek pizza come to corner the market in the Granite State?

Jimmy Gutierrez for NHPR

Matthew Jones from Hudson and I share a common beef with New Hampshire: a serious lack of great pizza. Matthew reached out to us through our Only in New Hampshire project, in which we do our best to answer listener questions about quirks of the Granite State.

He wrote to us with a question (or three) about New Hampshire pizza:

Why does every town have a House of Pizza? And why is every House of Pizza exclusively the Greek style of pizza? And why is the Greek pizza so popular here?

AP

The obituary, so stark and visceral, captured the public’s attention.

It was for 24-year-old Molly Alice Parks. She died in 2015 of a heroin overdose in the bathroom of her Manchester workplace.

The obit’s final line: “If you have any loved ones who are fighting addiction, Molly’s family asks that you do everything possible to be supportive, and guide them to rehabilitation before it is too late.”

But what if you don’t? What if you’re lucky enough not to have a loved one battling this addiction?

Death Resulting

Jan 21, 2018

New Hampshire is one of the hardest hit states in the current overdose epidemic, leaving communities grasping for answers. Meanwhile, some local courts and prosecutors have dusted off an antiquated state statute called "Death Resulting" to target drug dealers. But how are courts discerning between dealers and people with active substance use disorders? On today's show, we'll hear a complicated and tragic story that may shed some light moving forward. 

*This story was produced with support from the Third Coast Radio Residency at Ragdale

This week on Word of Mouth, two stories about New Hampshire's past, and what it means for the future. First, what did New Hampshire's landscape look like before the intensive logging and development of the past few centuries, and what does that tell us about our history?

Next, a New Hampshire court case in the 1970s wound its way to the Supreme Court--and what seemed at the time to be a narrow freedom of speech case is still influencing laws today. 

Revisionist Holidays

Nov 17, 2017
Jen Steele, via Flickr CC http://bit.ly/2zPAB3x

Holidays don't simply spring into existence - they're conceptualized, created, lobbied for, and passed into law by state and federal lawmakers. On this show, we're looking at the New Hampshire author Sarah Hale, who helped craft the modern traditions of Thanksgiving.  Also, a holiday that's still under construction: Indigenous People's Day.  

Via waterfrontagent.com

In our continuing series Only in New Hampshire, we tackle listener questions about the Granite State communities and occasionally get the chance to uncover a bit of hidden history.

So here’s a perfectly timed question from Katelin in Northwood. She wrote:

“I heard Northwood had some kind of important link on the way we celebrate Thanksgiving. I looked but never found it. Any ideas?”

New Hampshire has long been graying. And without a major metro area that draws young adults, it can reinforce a stereotype of the state as that quiet, bucolic territory in the middle of New England.

With that in mind, one listener asked our Only in NH series: Why does Portsmouth shut down at 9 p.m.?

NHPR’s Jimmy Gutierrez stepped out for a night on the town looking for answers. It's a question often asked in some towns. But Portsmouth? Doesn't the Port City have a bustling night scene? 

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