Jacqui Fulton | New Hampshire Public Radio

Jacqui Fulton

Producer / Reporter

Jacqui Fulton is, in her own words, "podcast and public radio’s biggest fan.” She even built a recording studio in her closet.

She’s the creator and producer of the narrative podcast “Backwoods” and contributes to Otto Radio.

Jacqui previously worked at WUTC and attended the Transom Storytelling Workshop,

Sara Plourde/NHPR

Today’s Ask Civics 101 question: What is the General Services Administration (GSA)?

Read on for the answer.

Do you have a question for the team? Click here to submit it.

Sara Plourde/NHPR

Today’s Ask Civics 101 question: How do recounts work? 

Read on, or listen to this short episode for the answer.

Do you have a question for the team? Click here to submit it.

Sara Plourde/NHPR

Today’s Ask Civics 101 question: What are concession speeches?

Read on, or listen to this short episode for the answer.

Do you have a question for the team? Click here to submit it.

The electoral college has been called “complicated and confusing.” But our Civics 101 Shorts series eat “complicated and confusing” for breakfast! This episode explores what the electoral college is, why we have it, and how it works.

 

N. Mendal Shafer

The United States government spreads power across three branches of government: the executive, legislative, and judicial branches. Why three branches? What does each branch do that the others cannot? And how do they work together? 

Today’s Civics Short, designed for middle schoolers but fun for all, takes a closer look at the who, what, where, and whys of the Census.

US Census Bureau

Every ten years the United States government tries to count every person in the country with a census. What is the census? Why does the government need to count people? Who is it doing the counting? Today’s Civics Short, designed for middle schoolers but fun for all, takes a closer look at the who, what, where, and whys of the Census.

Centers for Disease Control

The CDC, or the Centers for Disease Control, have been in the news a lot lately. But what is the CDC? And what does it do? Today’s Civics Short, designed for middle schoolers but fun for all, takes a closer look at the who, what, where, and whys of the CDC.

Pete Souza/Wikimedia

A presidential election occurs every four years in this country. But how do you actually run for president? Who gets to do it? How do you launch a campaign? NHPR’s own Civics 101 has the answer with a new series of “civics shorts,” quick lessons and stories aimed at middle schoolers…but a good refresher for us all. Find more Civics 101 episodes.

Allegra Boverman | NHPR

Thousands of people went to the polls yesterday to vote in New Hampshire's first in the nation primary.

Charles Cooper wasn't one of them.

In the past few months, many of the candidates running for the Democratic presidential nomination  have passed through the studios of New Hampshire Public Radio, on the top floor of an office building in Concord.

On their way to the elevator, they had to pass by the Pillsbury Cafe and Pantry, owned by Cooper and his wife Jill.

Ursula Marvin
Smithsonian

Today, we're looking skyward to explore the life of geologist Ursula Marvin, who used her exceptional ability to identify minerals to study asteroids. Planetary geology wasn't a field that welcomed women but Marvin never let that stop her. In the 1970s, she became the first woman to travel to Antarctica to hunt for meteorites. 

Also, another story from our continuing series on vanity plates.

Gap Mountain Goats

As far back as ancient Egypt, it was possible to rent a professional mourner to cry and moan at your funeral. They put on a dramatic show so people know you'll be missed. Even now, in parts of the world, if you fork over a little extra cash, a hired mourner will even hurl themselves into your grave. Newer fads also include renting an extra family member, professional cuddlers-for-hire, or even an entourage, complete with paparazzi and an adoring crowd of cheering fans.

But in New Hampshire, rental options lean towards the bucolic: instead of a team of human landscapers, you can hire yourself a herd of goats to clear brush.


Don Kreis

At the Department of Motor Vehicles, Don Kreis took a number and waited to be called up to the desk. When he filled out a form requesting a custom license plate, the woman who reviewed the form paused.

 

“If you don’t mind me asking,” she said, “why did you ask for this particular vanity plate?” Don had requested what appeared to be a jumble of letters and numbers on his license plate: N1303K.

 

“When I explained it to her,” he says, “she actually started to cry.”

Andover Beacon

Two hundred years ago, Richard Potter was one of the nation’s most famous entertainers, but he’s all but vanished from public memory. So has his extravagant house.