Ellen Grimm | New Hampshire Public Radio

Ellen Grimm

Senior Producer, The Exchange

Before joining NHPR as producer for The Exchange in 2011, Ellen Grimm worked as a freelance reporter, covering Manchester for NHPR and writing for The Associated Press, New Hampshire Business Review, and The Telegraph of Nashua. Before moving to New Hampshire in 1996, she worked as an editor and writer in Boston, including as a freelance reporter for The Boston Globe. She has also spent some time writing fiction, earning an MFA in creative writing from Cornell University in 1990.

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After days of hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee, U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen, who is running for a third term, apparently has made up her mind on Judge Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s nominee to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. 

Dan Tuohy for NHPR

 

The former two-term Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick, who filed for the New Hampshire primary a day before the deadline, says he felt the need to jump into the presidential race because he offers a different approach – and not just from President Trump.

 

“I've been concerned that we have been offering, and this is a gross generalization, but either nostalgia, meaning we'll just get rid of, as they say, President Trump and go back to doing what we used to do, which is not what we need right now,” Patrick said on The Exchange. “Or our version of anger and division instead of theirs, which I also think sort of misses the moment. And so I think there is still a path.”

 

(For the full conversation, visit here.)

 

Johannes Thiel via Flickr cc

 

Breaking up is hard to do. But in New Hampshire, multi-town school districts and administrative units (SAUs) are doing just that. Some say the process should be made easier, particularly for cooperative districts that were designed to discourage dissolution. But others warn of unintended consequences for students.  

School enrollment throughout New England has been declining, a demographic change that has prompted Maine and Vermont to encourage districts and towns to combine schools and resources to save money and provide educational opportunities for students.