Colin Dwyer | New Hampshire Public Radio

Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the News Desk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

Pfizer is formally asking federal authorities to authorize its COVID-19 vaccine for emergency use. The pharmaceutical giant and its partner BioNTech announced that they are submitting their request to the Food and Drug Administration on Friday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is strongly recommending that people stay home for Thanksgiving to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. With the holiday one week away, the agency issued a statement that taking a trip to see loved ones is simply inadvisable right now.

Updated at 11:36 a.m. ET

Officials in Michigan's most populous county reversed course and certified its election results Tuesday evening, just a few hours after a surprising party-line deadlock suddenly cast the certification of more than 800,000 votes in doubt. Wayne County voted overwhelmingly for President-elect Joe Biden.

Twitter says a total of 130 accounts were hacked in some fashion during a cybersecurity breach on Wednesday that affected some of its most prominent users, including Joe Biden and Kanye West.

Just two days after federal officials barred international students from attending U.S. colleges that go online-only this fall, Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have made their objections clear. They sued the U.S. government in federal court Wednesday, seeking to have the U.S. Immigration Customs And Enforcement policy reversed and declared unlawful.

Updated at 4:54 p.m. ET

Jair Bolsonaro has tested positive for the coronavirus.

The Brazilian president, who has consistently downplayed the dangers of the virus, revealed his positive test result during nationally televised remarks Tuesday. "It came back positive," he told reporters from behind a mask.

Updated 2:30 a.m. ET Sunday

One person has been killed and one hospitalized in serious condition after a vehicle barreled past a police barrier and into protesters on a freeway in Seattle this weekend.

24-year-old Summer Taylor died Saturday evening at Harborview Medical Center, according hospital spokeswoman Susan Gregg. Diaz Love, 32, remains in serious condition.

The grim news has taken no respite this Fourth of July.

Updated at 3:09 p.m. ET

The release of former national security adviser John Bolton's new book, The Room Where It Happened, remains on track after a federal judge on Saturday rejected the Trump administration's request to block its release.

Judge Royce Lamberth of the D.C. District Court said that Bolton may still be facing legal trouble and that because of a rush to print, it was likely his book contains classified information.

Another Confederate monument has fallen — this time in a city where such memorials were understandably rare to begin with: the nation's capital.

Protesters on Friday night toppled a statue of Confederate Gen. Albert Pike, the only outdoor Confederate memorial in the city. They yanked it down with rope and later set it ablaze as law enforcement looked on.

Updated at 7:17 p.m. ET

President Trump has removed Geoffrey Berman, the U.S. attorney for the Southern District of New York, from office, ending the tenure of a top Justice Department official whose office has overseen the prosecutions of several of the president's associates.

Attorney General William Barr announced the termination Saturday, less than a day after initially suggesting that Berman was resigning — only to be contradicted by Berman himself.

Updated at 3:36 p.m. ET

The weeks since the killing of George Floyd have been a cauldron of outrage, frustration and, at times, violence. But on Friday, Juneteenth brought another emotion to this simmering mixture: the joy of celebration.

Updated at 7:25 p.m. ET Friday

Facebook and Twitter said Friday that a post shared by President Trump about a "racist baby" has been removed from the platforms following a copyright complaint from one of the children's parents.

Officials at both social media companies confirmed to NPR that the president's video was deleted from the platforms following a request from the rights holder.

The action comes after Twitter on Thursday added a label to the tweet warning that the content contained manipulated media intended to deceive viewers.

Updated at 5:13 p.m. ET Friday

Garrett Rolfe and Devin Brosnan, the arresting officers involved in the shooting death of Rayshard Brooks, turned themselves in on Thursday. The men were booked separately Thursday at the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta.

George Floyd struggled desperately to make himself heard during his arrest. With a Minneapolis police officer's knee planted on his neck for more than 8 minutes, he pleaded for help, said he couldn't breathe — and finally, fell silent.

On Wednesday, more than three weeks after Floyd's killing, his brother raised a voice on his behalf in a message to international diplomats.

The president of Honduras has contracted the coronavirus.

You'd be forgiven for not knowing that the Polish military recently invaded and briefly occupied territory in the Czech Republic. Seems like headline news, sure — but it appears that even the Polish troops didn't know what they were doing.

A spokesperson for the Czech Foreign Ministry confirmed to NPR on Saturday that "Polish soldiers mistakenly deterred our citizens from entering a church on the Czech territory in close vicinity of the Czech-Polish borders."

For nearly two months, the Chinese capital, a city of more than 20 million people, did not report a single local case of the coronavirus. But a recent spike in confirmed cases has officials in Beijing afraid they're staring down a new outbreak — and they are responding with swift and sweeping measures to contain it.

When Dr. Li Wenliang died of COVID-19 several weeks after the Chinese whistleblower tried to warn the world about the coronavirus, his family was expecting to grow in the coming months.

Now his widow, Fu Xuejie, has welcomed their second child, a boy, to the world without him.

"Husband, are you watching from heaven? The last gift you sent to me has been born," Fu said in a note posted to the Chinese social media platform WeChat. "I will definitely take care of him well."

Kathy Sullivan has seen her share of highs and lows.

Sullivan, the first U.S. woman to walk in space, a veteran of three shuttle missions and an enshrined member of the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame, took a perilous journey downward this week.

She became the first woman to reach Challenger Deep, the deepest known point on Earth, in the Pacific.

Updated at 12:53 p.m. ET

Prosecutors have handed down charges for the two Buffalo Police officers seen apparently shoving an elderly protester in a graphic video earlier this week.

Nearly every country in the world has confirmed cases of the coronavirus within its borders — but few have received the kind of global scrutiny that Sweden has.

That's because its uniquely relaxed response to the virus, with no strict lockdown, proved such a departure from not only its Nordic neighbors but also much of the rest of the world.

Six Atlanta police officers are facing a slew of charges for their role in the arrest of two young people last weekend. The incident, during which officers used stun guns on the pair and pulled them from their vehicle, received national attention after bystanders recorded and posted video to social media.

Updated at 4:41 p.m. ET

Faced with a fourth straight night of massive protests over the death of George Floyd, Minnesota on Friday deployed its largest law enforcement operation in state history, including more than 700 members of the National Guard.

"It was not enough," Maj. Gen. Jon A. Jensen said Saturday.

Now, with a fifth night of protests looming, Jensen, head of the state's National Guard, said authorities are drastically increasing the military presence in Minneapolis.

The Supreme Court has rejected a California church's attempt to overturn the state's coronavirus restrictions on in-person religious services.

In a 5-4 decision issued late Friday, Chief Justice John Roberts sided with the court's liberal bloc in upholding the state's right to impose limits on congregations in order to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Updated at 10:56 p.m. ET

Derek Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer involved in George Floyd's death on Monday, has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman announced the charges Friday, shortly after Chauvin was taken into custody by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

The announcement comes days after the release of a video that shows Chauvin's knee pressed firmly on the black man's neck for at least seven minutes.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

Just one day after the death of a black man whose arrest was recorded and posted on social media by a passerby, Minneapolis is grappling with the fallout that has spread beyond city limits.

The disturbing video of Monday night's death — during which a white officer's knee was planted firmly on George Floyd's neck and his desperate calls for help were ignored — has prompted protests in the Minnesota city and demands for charges for the officers involved.

Mayor Bill de Blasio expects up to to 400,000 New York City residents to head back to work in the first half of next month, as the city prepares to begin lifting some of its most stringent coronavirus restrictions. That's the upshot of the mayor's news conference Thursday at City Hall, during which he laid out what to expect from a city that emerged weeks ago as the epicenter of the outbreak in the U.S.

Updated at 4 a.m. ET Friday

Fire ravaged the 3rd Precinct police building in Minneapolis on Thursday night as thousands of people jammed downtown streets on the third night of furious protests over the death of a black man after an encounter with police. A police spokesman said personnel at the precinct were safe.

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