Adrian Florido

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Local lawmakers in San Francisco have given the mayor 12 days to secure 7,000 hotel rooms to house the city's homeless population during the coronavirus emergency, plus another 1,250 rooms for frontline workers.

The emergency ordinance passed by the San Francisco Board of Supervisors requires Mayor London Breed to secure the rooms by April 26 and asks her to use emergency powers to commandeer the rooms if she is unable to reach deals with hotel owners.

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Puerto Rico has instituted some of the strictest measures to contain COVID-19. Governor Wanda Vazquez has more than 3 million people under a stay-at-home order. Here's NPR's Adrian Florido to explain why.

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Weeks after a powerful earthquake and dozens of aftershocks in Puerto Rico, President Trump has signed a major disaster declaration, which means federal money can now be used to help damaged towns along the island's southern coast.

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People in Puerto Rico are edgy after two big earthquakes on the island. The last one was on Saturday. It was a 5.9. A bigger quake four days before that killed one person. Much of the south lost power, and there are millions of dollars in damage.

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When President Trump landed in Dayton, Ohio, yesterday, he was met by protesters chanting two words.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

UNIDENTIFIED PROTESTERS: Do something. Do something. Do something. Do something...

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Puerto Rico's governor says he's quitting - just not right now. Ricardo Rossello made that announcement in response to protesters who were expecting a lot more, which explains why they are still planning to protest today.

Updated at 4:45 a.m. Tuesday

The governor of Puerto Rico is resisting calls to resign despite growing protests against his government after leaked text chats revealed conversations rife with homophobic and misogynistic slurs.

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César Díaz felt lucky that only a couple of leaks had sprung in his ceiling, even though Hurricane Maria tore the zinc panels off much of his roof. His real troubles began about a year after the storm, when a crew hired by Puerto Rico's housing department showed up to make the repairs.

"They weren't very professional," Díaz said. "They didn't wear gloves, and they asked if I had an extra piece of wood."

Within days, there were new leaks. Not only in the living room but in the bedroom, over his daughter's crib.

The musical Hamilton is opening tonight in Puerto Rico. Its creator, Lin-Manuel Miranda, whose family is from Puerto Rico, is on the island to reprise the title role during the show's three-week run.

Thursday was a somber day at the Cockfighting Club of San Juan.

The rows and rows of cubbies that usually house up to 80 roosters waiting to fight were mostly empty. On this day, only 26 birds were on display.

Miguel Ortiz, a regular at the club since it opened in 1954, said a lot of people had stayed home, depressed.

"It's because of the law that passed in the Congress," he said.

In the lush green mountain town of Lares, Puerto Rico, even the dead and buried were scarred by Hurricane Maria.

The September 2017 storm dumped so much rain onto the town's only cemetery that it triggered a landslide. The flow of mud and water was so powerful that it damaged nearly 1,800 tombs — expelling caskets from their graves and sending some of them tumbling down a hillside.

Mabel Román Padró wishes she hadn't had to sue Puerto Rico's government.

But because she did, it translated an important report about Hurricane Maria into Spanish so she and most of the island's residents could read it.

"Access to information has always been hard here," Román said.

Updated at 9:25 p.m. ET

Puerto Rico's governor updated the island's official death toll for victims of Hurricane Maria on Tuesday, hours after independent researchers from George Washington University released a study estimating the hurricane caused 2,975 deaths in the six months following the storm.

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For more than a week, Puerto Rico's representative in Congress has been urging the Federal Emergency Management Agency to extend the contract under which mainland power crews have been helping repair the island's power grid.

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