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California Snowpack Not Showing Any Promise For Ending Drought

Frank Gehrke, chief of California Cooperative Snow Surveys Program for the Department of Water Resources, walks past some weeds emerging from the snow pack as he conducts the second snow survey of the season at Echo Summit, Calif., Thursday, Jan. 29,  2015. The survey showed the snow pack to to be 7.1 inches deep with a water content of 2.3 inches, which is 12 percent of normal for this site at this time of year. In a normal year this location is usually covered in several feet of snow. (Rich Pedroncelli/AP)
Frank Gehrke, chief of California Cooperative Snow Surveys Program for the Department of Water Resources, walks past some weeds emerging from the snow pack as he conducts the second snow survey of the season at Echo Summit, Calif., Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015. The survey showed the snow pack to to be 7.1 inches deep with a water content of 2.3 inches, which is 12 percent of normal for this site at this time of year. In a normal year this location is usually covered in several feet of snow. (Rich Pedroncelli/AP)

Reports that California experienced its second driest January for a second year in a row have many predicting that the drought will continue in 2015.

While cities like San Francisco have seen no measurable rain this year, the snowpacks in the hinterlands of California are also seeing less of the fluffy white stuff.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Frank Gehrke, chief of snow surveys for the California Department of Water Resources, about what he is finding in the snowpack region.

Guest

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