Coronavirus Coverage | New Hampshire Public Radio

Coronavirus Coverage

Credit Centers for Disease Control

Important links:

For more info on COVID-19 in N.H., visit the N.H. Dep. of Health & Human Services page here

CDC

There's been a steady rise in the number of COVID-19 cases in New Hampshire over the last two weeks, but the number of deaths and hospitalizations due to the virus have remained flat.

How should we make sense of the current coronavirus numbers? NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Dr. Michael Calderwood, an infectious disease expert at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, about what trends we should be paying attention to.

Maine is investigating a possible COVID-19 outbreak at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard.
Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A commuter van that transported workers in Maine to the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in Kittery may be the source of a new COVID-19 outbreak, the Maine Centers for Disease Control announced Thursday.

Officials say they’re investigating 18 cases total at the facility, with 13 among Maine residents and the rest from New Hampshire and Massachusetts.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Activists gathered Thursday night for a virtual vigil to honor lives lost to coronavirus and condemn President Trump's handling of the pandemic.

The event – organized by Black Lives Matter Manchester, Rights and Democracy, and the New Hampshire Youth Movement - was streamed from near the Trump campaign office in Manchester.

A tweet from UNH faculty member Clark Knowles
Via Twitter

During Wednesday’s legislative session at the University of New Hampshire's Whittemore Center, a handful of state representatives drank beer and did not wear masks outside of the center, despite the town of Durham’s mask mandate.

UNH students and staff have criticized this behavior online.

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Updated on Sept. 18 at 2:15 p.m. ET

At the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, there were lots of stories about scrappy manufacturers promising to revamp their factories to start making personal protective equipment in the U.S.

Back in the spring, fuel-cell maker Adaptive Energy retooled part of its factory in Ann Arbor, Mich., to make plastic face shields. Now, 100,000 finished shields are piling up in cardboard boxes on the factory floor — unsold.

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

School districts will be getting less money from the federal government than they expected this fall to cover COVID-related expenses.

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For months, officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) had told schools that they were eligible for reimbursement for PPE, plastic desk barriers, cleaning supplies, and other materials.

Updated at 6:50 p.m. ET

President Trump on Wednesday again said widespread distribution of a vaccine against the coronavirus would happen before the end of the year, directly contradicting Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Robert Redfield. The CDC chief testified earlier Wednesday that a vaccine would not be widely available until next spring or summer.

Trump said he expects the government to be able to distribute a vaccine "sometime in October," though "it may be a little later than that."

We talk with members of a team formed especially to study disparities in the state's pandemic response. Topmost among their messages, in a report issued this summer: Health has to do with much more than clinical care; it is a matter of housing, schooling, employment -- areas where members of racial and ethnic minority groups have suffered from discrimination. Still, the report proposes some simple starting points toward improving health outcomes. Some have already been set in motion. We look at these, as well as other more long-term goals included in the report. 

<a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/cc_chapman/4878972642/in/photostream/" target="blank">CC Chapman</a> via Flickr/Creative Commons

A Massachusetts-based flag football league is facing $2,000 fine for violating a New Hampshire emergency order issued as part of the state's response to COVID-19.

The New England Flag Football League hosted a tournament in Epping, N.H., toward the end of August, with teams from Ohio, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin participating.

Shane Adams via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/OJ5Pe

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del martes 15 de septiembre.  

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Se registran 18 nuevos casos de COVD-19 en el estado, cinco de estos tienen  menos de 18 años

18 [dieciocho] personas más han dado positivo en la prueba de COVD-19 en New Hampshire. Esto lleva al total de casos en el estado a 7,714 [siete mil setecientos catorce]. 

Shane Adams via Flickr/CC - http://ow.ly/OJ5Pe

In the months following the end of state and federal eviction moratoriums, evictions in New Hampshire have been on the rise.

Since the end of June, New Hampshire courts have approved 673 orders to evict tenants.  Nearly half of those are just from the month of August.

File Photo, NHPR

Most students in the Manchester School District are still learning remotely. But kindergarteners and first-graders returned to school buildings last week.

These younger students are the first to test out the district's hybrid learning model.

Office designers are scrambling now to try to get more members of the workforce safely back to their desks. Clear plastic sneeze guards have become familiar, as have floors taped off at 6-foot increments. But by 2025 or so, after the immediate threat of the coronavirus has likely passed, which short-term fixes will be part of the new normal? And what other design changes could be coming our way?

After I shared my family's experience in trying to care for my 92-year-old grandmother in the pandemic, I wanted to know: How do we help older people feel safe and comfortable — and happy — in these times?

DHHS

A coronavirus outbreak among students at Windham High School will force that school to remain remote for at least the next week.

The school was supposed to reopen with a hybrid model on Wednesday, but news that sixteen students had tested positive for COVID-19 prompted the school to change its plans last minute and reopen with a remote model.

Sarah Gibson / NHPR

For months, families across New Hampshire have been wondering what school would look like. And now, a lot of them have a first taste. There have been technological glitches and reports of positive coronavirus cases in several districts.

But as NHPR’s Sarah Gibson reports, many people say they’re relieved the new school year has finally begun.

Flickr/Ivan Radic

The state’s online charter school is getting $7 million in CARES Act funding, in response to a massive spike in enrollment during the pandemic.

The Exeter-based Virtual Learning Academy Charter School (VLACS) offers online classes to students in New Hampshire. Demand for VLACS classes tripled over the summer as families looked for options to remain remote this school year. Despite hiring more than 70 new teachers, VLACS says thousands of potential part-time students are still on the wait list.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

College presidents provided an update on Thursday to the University System of New Hampshire board of trustees on how reopening is going.

Jim Dean, president of the University of New Hampshire, said most of the 80 active cases of COVID-19 on campus are asymptomatic students.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

A school year like no other is underway in New Hampshire.

By mid-week, most districts had reopened with a fully in-person, hybrid, or remote model, and families, teachers, and students were getting a first glimpse of what education during the pandemic could be like for months to come.

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

President Trump is defending himself after interviews from a new book by legendary reporter Bob Woodward reveal that Trump acknowledged the deadliness of the coronavirus in early February and admitted in March to playing down its severity.

Via Theta Chi UNH on Facebook.

State health officials are investigating a potential outbreak of COVID-19 tied to a large fraternity party at the University of New Hampshire last weekend.

Eleven people diagnosed with COVID-19 have connections to the August 29 party hosted by the Theta Chi fraternity.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

As the new college semester gets underway at campuses across New Hampshire, state health officials are reporting 25 active cases of COVID-19 at five schools across the state.

Tonia Orlando

Some schools are wrapping up their first week of classes on Friday - whether that's remote, hybrid or fully in person. NHPR’s Sarah Gibson caught up with one school leader about what it's been like so far.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently sent guidance to states on how to prepare to distribute a COVID-19 vaccine. The agency asked for a distribution plan as soon as October and said that vaccination sites should be ready by Nov. 1. Those dates caught a lot of people off guard and set off some alarm bells that political pressure was tainting the process.

During this pandemic, I've been worried about my grandma — Nanay, to me. That's Tagalog for mother.

Her name is Felisa Mercene. She's a Filipino American immigrant. She's 92. Since March, she's been living in isolation from most of our family in Southern California. Her relatives have been wary of visiting. What if they had COVID-19 and infected her?

3,000 miles away in Washington, D.C., where I live, I wondered: Is she feeling safe? Is she happy? Or ... is she lonely?

Jessica Arnold/Arnold Imaging LLC

New Hampshire schools can continue offering meals to all young people under 18 free of charge for the rest of the calendar year.

Schools have had more flexiblity to provide meals and receive reimbursement from the federal government since the USDA issued waivers during remote learning last spring.

The Trump administration is ordering a halt on evictions nationwide through December for people who have lost work during the pandemic and don't have other good housing options.

The new eviction ban is being enacted through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The goal is to stem the spread of the COVID-19 outbreak, which the agency says in its order "presents a historic threat to public health."

Shannon Jackson

College students this year are experiencing profound changes with what it means to be in college, and that’s led some to completely change their plans.

NHPR’s Daniela Allee has this story of how some college freshmen are making this year work for them. 

Kim Bock is the head of New Hampshire Coalition of Recovery Residences, which provides support for groups that help people recovering from addiction. She says a lot of these places do not have enough tenants to survive.

“They are not getting income from people that are within the house,” said Bock, who noted that that occupancy rates for the houses are lower than before the pandemic. “What are we five or six months in now?” Bock said. “Seven houses have closed because they can’t sustain that.”

As the fall semester gets underway, college students are reuniting with their friends, getting (re)acquainted with campus and doing what college students often do: partying. But in the time of the coronavirus, as more parties surface university administrators have been quick to condemn — and even berate — the behavior of students.

"Be better. Be adults. Think of someone other than yourself," pleaded a letter to students at Syracuse University following a large gathering on campus.

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