Victoria Whitley-Berry | New Hampshire Public Radio

Victoria Whitley-Berry

Victoria Whitley-Berry (she/they) is a director and producer for Morning Edition. They joined NPR in 2016 as an intern for All Things Considered on the weekend. Born and raised in Tallahassee, Fla., Whitley-Berry has a bachelor of arts degree in journalism from Texas Christian University.

For NPR, they've covered LGBTQ representation in children's television, the impact of U.S. sanctions from Iran, the first legal same-sex marriage ceremony in the U.S. and Vice President Joe Biden's 2020 presidential bid from the floor of his moving campaign bus somewhere in rural Iowa.

When they're not directing Morning Edition overnight, Whitley-Berry directs special coverage on behalf of NPR. They have led live broadcasts of the House impeachment inquiry, the Senate impeachment trial and President George H.W. Bush's funeral.

If they're not working, you can find them either at a barre class or on the hunt for a good taqueria.

Katy Perry has had nine No. 1 songs since 2008, including "Teenage Dream," "California Gurls" and "Roar." She has this upbeat, candy-coated, not-quite-real human-with-real-human-problems persona. And then in 2017, she released an album called Witness that was supposed to show a more authentic Katy. Critics didn't love it; more importantly, a lot of her fans didn't either. Her response is her new record, Smile, which is out Aug. 28.

With less than 100 days until the 2020 presidential election, Ohio's 18 electoral votes are in play.

The state went for President Trump in 2016, and Ashtabula County is one reason why.

The pandemic, a bad economy, police killings and a fight for racial equality: It's a lot of take in. For some, music has been a way to cope and try to make sense of it all and that is the premise behind the Morning Edition Song Project, in which we asked musicians to write and perform an original song about this moment.

Showrunner Noelle Stevenson has always been a fan of science fiction and fantasy. As a kid, she loved it all: the epic space battles, the magic, the quests that seemed larger than life.

But there was a problem with her favorite childhood stories, like Star Wars and The Lord of The Rings series. "I never quite saw myself reflected in them," Stevenson says, "certainly not at the heart of the story."

There weren't a lot of women.

At a cancer treatment center in Iran's capital of Tehran, a doctor's fight to treat her cancer patients has become harder. As U.S. sanctions sink in, the flow of medicine and medical supplies in Iran appears to have slowed — and the reasons are difficult to pin down.

Dr. Mastaneh Sanei, an oncologist at the Roshana Cancer Center, says she's treating patients without the benefits of consistently functioning equipment and a reliable supply of drugs.

With the right treatment, she says, "you may not cure these patients, but they have the chance to prolong survival."