Jacqui Helbert

Producer / Reporter

Jacqui Helbert is, in her own words, "podcast and public radio’s biggest fan.” She even built a recording studio in her closet.

She’s the creator and producer of the narrative podcast “Backwoods” and contributes to Otto Radio.

Jacqui previously worked at WUTC and attended the Transom Storytelling Workshop with our own Jimmy Gutierrez.

Allegra Boverman | NHPR

Thousands of people went to the polls yesterday to vote in New Hampshire's first in the nation primary.

Charles Cooper wasn't one of them.

In the past few months, many of the candidates running for the Democratic presidential nomination  have passed through the studios of New Hampshire Public Radio, on the top floor of an office building in Concord.

On their way to the elevator, they had to pass by the Pillsbury Cafe and Pantry, owned by Cooper and his wife Jill.

Ursula Marvin
Smithsonian

Today, we're looking skyward to explore the life of geologist Ursula Marvin, who used her exceptional ability to identify minerals to study asteroids. Planetary geology wasn't a field that welcomed women but Marvin never let that stop her. In the 1970s, she became the first woman to travel to Antarctica to hunt for meteorites. 

Also, another story from our continuing series on vanity plates.

Gap Mountain Goats

As far back as ancient Egypt, it was possible to rent a professional mourner to cry and moan at your funeral. They put on a dramatic show so people know you'll be missed. Even now, in parts of the world, if you fork over a little extra cash, a hired mourner will even hurl themselves into your grave. Newer fads also include renting an extra family member, professional cuddlers-for-hire, or even an entourage, complete with paparazzi and an adoring crowd of cheering fans.

But in New Hampshire, rental options lean towards the bucolic: instead of a team of human landscapers, you can hire yourself a herd of goats to clear brush.


Don Kreis

At the Department of Motor Vehicles, Don Kreis took a number and waited to be called up to the desk. When he filled out a form requesting a custom license plate, the woman who reviewed the form paused.

 

“If you don’t mind me asking,” she said, “why did you ask for this particular vanity plate?” Don had requested what appeared to be a jumble of letters and numbers on his license plate: N1303K.

 

“When I explained it to her,” he says, “she actually started to cry.”

Andover Beacon

Two hundred years ago, Richard Potter was one of the nation’s most famous entertainers, but he’s all but vanished from public memory. So has his extravagant house.