Sarah Gibson | New Hampshire Public Radio

Sarah Gibson

Reporter

Sarah Gibson joined NHPR's newsroom in 2018. She reports on New Hampshire's southern tier.

Sarah came to New Hampshire from New York City, where she was a producer at WNYC. A graduate of Columbia Journalism School, her stories have appeared on WBAI, Alaska Public Media, and in The Village Voice. Prior to journalism, Sarah worked with non-profits in North Carolina and studied History at Brown University. She grew up in rural Vermont.

Ways to Connect

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

School districts in the Monadnock region are continuing to press New Hampshire's highest court to force the state to reevaluate its approach to public education funding.

Courtesy of N.H. Attorney General's office

The New Hampshire Attorney General's office has concluded that officers were justified in their use of force during a high-profile standoff last March that resulted in the death of three civilians.

The incident took place at the Manchester Quality Inn on South Willow Street on March 27-28, 2019.

Courtesy of Facebook/Nashua Children's Home

The state’s residential facilities and detention center for youth are modifying operations in response to the coronavirus pandemic, but some advocates say change isn’t coming fast enough.

As of April 1, about 350 young people were in residential facilities operated by 13 different providers across the state. About half of the youth are involved in the juvenile justice system; the rest were placed by child protective services.

jimmywayne / Flickr Creative Commons

Universities and colleges are sending updated guidance to families on how to fill out the U.S. Census, in light of confusion over student residency during campus closures caused by the coronavirus.

File Photo, NHPR

New Hampshire school districts are weighing whether to cancel April vacation in light of coronavirus-related closures. Some districts have sent out surveys to families and teachers before making a final call this week.

Click here to sign up for our newsletter to get the latest updates on coronavirus in New Hampshire delivered to your inbox.  

Sara Plourde, NHPR

The 2020 U.S. Census is underway. The dicennial population count affects political power on a local, federal and state level, and it guides billions of dollars of federal spending.

 

Here's what you need to know about the census, why it matters in New Hampshire, and how the coronavirus pandemic is affecting it.

Courtesy Krystin Cooney

Families are spending a lot of time together these days, often confined to their houses – and if they’re lucky, some open space or woods nearby.

That's led to some deep explorations for one family into the mysteries behind their house.

Courtesy of Baer

The Exeter New Hampshire-based hockey gear company Bauer is joining other manufacturers and universities in a push to make protective gear for medical staff and first responders.

Bauer's factory, located outside of Montreal, usually makes skates for professional hockey players. But in late March, it began designing plastic face shields meant to give people wearing masks an extra layer of protection from the coronavirus.

Bauer’s sister company in Liverpool, New York, typically manufactures lacrosse equipment. Now it is also making face shields.

Courtesy of Liz Kirwan

New Hampshire school districts began another week of remote learning with a new timeline: school closures until at least May, if not the rest of the semester.

Schools are figuring out how to deliver the essentials to students at home, but a lot of teachers and families say that even those basics are overwhelming. 

Courtesy of Timberlane Regional School District

Families in the Timberlane Regional School District are awaiting a school board vote Tuesday night that will determine whether to allow videoconferencing for remote learning.

The board will vote on a memorandum of understanding between the Timberlane Teachers’ Association and the district, outlining the implementation of videoconferencing and giving staff the option to use it.

As of now, there is no video conferencing in the district, making it an outlier in the statewide shift to online remote learning.

US Army Corp of Engineers / Flickr CC

A coalition of administrative and teacher associations is issuing recommendations for remote learning in New Hampshire. The guidance comes as districts face long-term school closure until at least May, if not for the rest of the semester.

Click here to sign up for our newsletter to get the latest updates on coronavirus in New Hampshire delivered to your inbox.

Courtesy of Gabby Oja

Schools are wrapping up their first full week of remote learning - and for many students and teachers, that’s meant a lot of time online. But this transition has been particularly difficult for families without reliable internet at home.

biologycorner / Flickr Creative Commons

 

Groups representing public school administrators and teachers are calling for the state to postpone student assessments this spring, in light of emergency school closures.

U.S. Department of Education told states they could apply for a waiver to defer tests required by federal law until the end of the national emergency. The DOE is streamlining the application process for states applying for the waiver; nearly all have applied, with the exception of New Hampshire.

U.S. Census Bureau

 

Officials with the 2020 Census are changing outreach efforts in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

On Wednesday, the U.S. Census Bureau announced it was suspending all field operations until April 1. Officials are also postponing the date to count homeless residents in New Hampshire.

And in historically undercounted immigrant and refugeee communities, groups are rethinking or postponing mobile assistance centers meant to help people without computers, phones, or internet complete the census online.

NHPR Photo

It’s a big transition week for school districts in New Hampshire. By next Monday, they’re expected to begin remote learning for students until at least April 3, as part of the state’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Districts are communicating with families and teachers about how this will all work, but many questions remain. 

Courtesy of Manchester School District

 

Manchester, the state's largest school district, is racing to get ready for remote learning as part of the statewide closure of all public schools.

Like many districts, Manchester is compiling data from surveys sent out to parents and students about their home access to Internet and computers or tablets. 

Courtesy of Martha Dalrymple

 

With New Hampshire schools now closed, teachers are facing an unprecedented challenge: how to teach their students remotely for at least three weeks. Schools are figuring out how to get meals and computers to students in need, and teachers are trying to figure out how to keep students engaged while isolated at home. NHPR’s Sarah Gibson has more.

Sarah Gibson | NHPR

The U.S. Census Bureau is urging residents to fill out the 2020 census online, by mail and over the phone by April 1 as a way to limit person-to-person contact as coronavirus continues to spread.

New Hampshire households are receiving mailers with directions to fill out the census online at my2020census.gov. The mailer includes a Census ID, but residents can still complete the survey without one.

File Photo, NHPR

As states across the country announce school closures in response to COVID-19, an increasing number of districts in New Hampshire are following suit, as they assess their ability to offer remote learning in the event of long-term shutdowns.

Manchester has passed a major hurdle in getting a new contract for its teachers. On Thursday, the school district announced that after 621 days without a contract, the city and the Manchester Education Association have reached a tentative agreement on a contract for teachers.

The Manchester Education Association is the largest of the district's six unions, with approximately 1,200 members.

USDA / Flickr CC

The New Hampshire Department of Education is asking the USDA for waivers so that schools can continue offering meals to students even if buildings close in response to COVID-19.

Other states are making similar requests, as schools prepare for the possibility of having to close buildings and shift to long-term remote instruction.

Click here for our live blog for the latest updates on coronavirus in New Hampshire.

John K via Flickr CC

Voters in Windham are considering a measure to get water to areas polluted by the chemical PFAS.  The proposed 1.6-mile water line would run along Route 111 through Windham's main commercial area.

Courtesy of U.S. Census

 

The U.S. Census Bureau is struggling to hire enough people in New Hampshire to help with the once-in-a-decade population count later this year.

Flickr/E Gregory

 

A federal judge in New York says a portion of the case against the Monroe, New Hampshire-based company Pete and Gerry's Organics can proceed. 

The animal rights group PETA sued the egg company last year on behalf of a group of customers, alleging that Pete and Gerry's was misleading customers about conditions on its farms.

 

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

Democratic presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg skipped the New Hampshire primary two weeks ago. But now that it’s over, his campaign here is growing.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

The Manchester school board approved a strategic plan Thursday night designed to improve equity and student outcomes throughout the district. 

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

Lawmakers heard testimony today on two bipartisan bills aimed at preventing sexual assault and helping survivors seek medical and legal services. 

SB 508 would remove the time limit for an alleged victim of sexual abuse to file a civil lawsuit. Right now, those abused as children have to file claims before they turn 30, and, if abused as an adult, they have to file within three years of the incident. 

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

Lawmakers, education advocates, and state officials are entering the third month of a high-profile battle over whether to accept a large federal grant to double the number of public charter schools in New Hampshire. 

Despite the grant’s likely demise, the debate surrounding it has reignited long-held tensions over charter schools, who they serve, and what they could mean for the future of public education in New Hampshire.

Courtesy N.H. Fish and Game

 

Low snow cover, warm spells this winter, and a mast crop of berries and acorns in the fall have more bears coming out of hibernation, particularly in the southeastern corner of the state.

Dan Bailey, a wildlife biologist with New Hampshire Fish and Game, says they are seeing more winter bear activity this year than usual, with regular sightings in people’s backyards.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Lawmakers on the fiscal committee voted today against accepting a $10 million federal grant for charter school expansion.

This was the fourth vote in two months against the grant, which aims to double the number of charter schools in New Hampshire over the next five years.

Democrats say it would undermine traditional public schools and cost the state millions of dollars down the road.

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