All Things Considered

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Every weekday, local host, Peter Biello, and national hosts Audie Cornish, Kelly McEvers, Ari Shapiro, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features from NHPR and NPR.

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Watching comedian Gilda Radner in the first years of "Saturday Night Live" was to watch a master shapeshifter who happened to be sidesplittingly funny.

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Frustration, futility, overwhelming sadness - these are all familiar feelings to fans of the Cleveland Browns, but not today. The Browns won last night for the first time in nearly two years. From member station WCPN, Glenn Forbes reports.

Despite being one of the first and oldest forms of popular music, opera sometimes struggles to connect with 21st century audiences. However, Anthony Roth Costanzo is breaking down the genre's stodgy stereotype and making opera more accessible — taking his distinctive sound to the masses, from a sixth-grade classroom in the Bronx to NPR's own Tiny Desk.

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Tracking two big political stories today - the first, the one that has dominated the news all week.

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And NPR's Scott Detrow joins me now to walk through where things stand with the Kavanaugh nomination and the latest on whether or not Ford will testify at a Senate hearing next week. Hey, Scott.

SCOTT DETROW, BYLINE: Hey there.

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A new bail reform law designed to prevent poor people from sitting in jail for not being able to post bail is now being implemented in New Hampshire courts.

Some county attorneys and others in law enforcement were skeptical of the new law, Senate Bill 556, and now some are saying the roll-out has been rocky.

NHPR's Peter Biello spoke with Rockingham County Attorney Patricia Conway about how the bill is affecting her office. Listen to the interview here.

For nearly two decades Enric Marco was a highly respected figure in Spain, widely known as a Holocaust survivor, Civil War hero and resistance fighter against the Francisco Franco regime. He even held public speaking engagements detailing his experiences in a concentration camp.

But every bit of it was a lie.

In 2005 Marco's masquerade was exposed to the world by historian Benito Bermejo — piquing the interest of novelist Javier Cercas. As Cercas soon discovered, "he had made up everything. Not only about that, I mean — he invented his whole life."

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And we're going to take you next to a place few Americans have ever seen - the inside of a classroom in North Korea.

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Philadelphia architect Robert Venturi died Tuesday at 93. Often credited as a major influence on the postmodern architecture movement, he celebrated oversized, playful elements and Vegas casinos.

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Kathy Mattea has been successfully making music for a long time. Her first gold album came out in 1987. She won her first Grammy in 1990. For a while, she was putting out albums every year or two. But Mattea's latest LP, Pretty Bird, out now, is the country artist's first release in six years — and it almost didn't come out at all.

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Allegra Boverman for NHPR

  We are a week into the general election and if one policy issue can be said to be at the center of the governor’s race, it may be paid family leave. Paid family leave has been a subject of longstanding debate in Concord, but until this year and this election – it’s never been what anyone would consider a political flashpoint. NHPR's Josh Rogers joined All Things Considered host Peter Biello to discuss why the matchup between Molly Kelly and Chris Sununu may make it one.  

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This week, the Currier Museum of Art in Manchester is welcoming art-lovers to its gallery for a new show. Boston-based artist and Tufts Professor Ethan Murrow has created wall drawings and a sculpture honoring Manchester's working class roots. Last week, ahead of the show's opening, he and a team of art students put the finishing touches on the drawings.

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Retirement for Guadalupe Padilla Mendoza meant pursuing her passion: rescuing dogs. The former public servant had begun taking street dogs into her home in Mexico City, squeezing as many as she could into a humble apartment.

But a 7.1 magnitude earthquake that ripped through her city and killed hundreds on Sept. 19, 2017, changed her plans.

The uproar over clergy sex abuse in the Catholic church is no longer just about sex abuse. It now touches on Catholic teaching about sexuality in general and even on Pope Francis himself, his agenda, and the future of his papacy.

When a Pennsylvania grand jury last month reported that more than 300 priests had molested more than a thousand children across six dioceses under investigation, it became clear that the cases were not isolated incidents. The problem of abusive priests and the bishops who cover up for them is systemic across the whole church.

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