Britta Greene

Upper Valley/Monadnock Reporter

Britta covers the Upper Valley and Monadnock regions for NHPR's newsroom. She comes to New Hampshire from Minnesota Public Radio, where she produced Morning Edition and other local programming. 

Ways to Connect

Britta Greene / NHPR

Keene State College welcomed 18 Steinway pianos Tuesday, replacing old and worn out instruments that had become expensive and difficult to keep up.

The school is now the first college in New Hampshire to have an All-Steinway designation, meaning all of its pianos are manufactured by the prestigious brand.

Robert Taylor via Flickr

 

This year's large number of squirrels are not just frustrating drivers around the region, but also farmers as the harvest season continues. 

 

[It's a Banner Year for Rodent Roadkill. Here's Why]

 

From Maine, across New Hampshire and Vermont, farmers are reporting significant damage to crops.

 

Sarah Gibson / New Hampshire Public Radio

Researchers at Dartmouth have completed a months-long study of Manchester's Safe Station program.

The city’s fire department started the effort about two and a half years ago as way to open their doors to those struggling with addiction.

Since then, they’ve logged more than 4,000 intakes, according to Chief Dan Goonan.

The National Institutes of Health was interested in formally documenting how the program works, as cities across the country are looking to replicate the model, said Lisa Marsch, with Dartmouth.

Sarah Gibson / New Hampshire Public Radio

For years, New Hampshire has relied on a largely patchwork strategy to address the opioid crisis, funding grassroots efforts community by community. That means an individual’s access to services depends a lot on where he or she lives. Now, state officials want to change that. But implementing a new, statewide system is easier said than done. In some cases it will mean replacing initiatives that already exist.

Appleswitch via Flickr Creative Commons

A former Claremont police officer is seeking to have a judge dismiss two of the six criminal charges against him. 

State prosecutors say the officer, Ian Kibbe, lied in written reports to justify searching a property earlier this year. The allegations have thrown into question much of his activity on the job, including a 2016 incident where he shot and killed a young man. 

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Governor Chris Sununu and suicide prevention advocates gathered in Concord Monday to recognize New Hampshire's Suicide Awareness Week.

Suicide is a growing challenge across the country, and New Hampshire's suicide rate has been rising faster than most, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control.

Speaking at the State House alongside mental health, business and law enforcement officials, Sununu emphasized a strategy of prevention.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Businesses that have signed on to Governor Chris Sununu's Recovery Friendly Workplace initiative will be attending regional orientations this month. 

The goal of the initiative is to get the private sector involved in addressing the opioid crisis, namely by hiring and supporting workers who are struggling with addiction.

The plan's been in the works for months, but so far details of how it'll actually work have been slim. Still, about 30 businesses have signed on, according to Jill Burke, with the Department of Health and Human Services. 

Paige Sutherland for NHPR

Hope for New Hampshire – an operator of drug recovery centers that received $600,000 in last-minute state funds this spring to maintain two locations outside its base in Manchester – has now closed one of those locations, in Franklin.

The Claremont school board voted Wednesday to allow a needle exchange program to operate at Valley Regional Hospital. The program needed board sign-off because of the hospital’s proximity to a local elementary zone.

Students at Dartmouth’s medical school will staff the exchange, which will likely open this fall or winter, said Valley Regional CEO Peter Wright.

It’s one of only a handful of programs to crop up across the state since New Hampshire legalized needle exchanges in 2017 in an effort to reduce the spread of infectious disease.

Bryan Pocius / Flickr Creative Commons

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has been running checkpoints in New Hampshire more frequently under the Trump administration, setting up on Interstate 93 near the small towns of Woodstock and Lincoln.

The stated goal of these stops is enforcing immigration law, and to that end, they have been fairly successful. Agents have arrested more than 50 people over the past two years who they determined to be in the country illegally. 

But those in support of the stops are often quick to turn attention to a topic other than immigration: drugs and the state’s opioid crisis.

Britta Greene

Every summer morning, Midge Eliassen has the same routine. She walks out her back door, down the steps, and onto her dock on Lake Sunapee.

There, she pulls out a plankton net and takes a sample from the water, shipping off the results to be analyzed in a lab at Dartmouth College.

She’s been doing this, rain or shine, for 12 years. “I get a chance to look at the world and see what the lake looks like each day, which I really love,” she said. 

Editor's Note: We strongly recommend listening to this story.

Kate Harper for NHPR

 

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders addressed a crowd of labor activists and democratic-party faithful Monday morning in Manchester, New Hampshire.

“The union movement today is the last line of resistance to the reactionary corporate agenda,” he said, urging his colleagues in Congress to back reforms making it easier for workers to organize.

He spoke at the annual AFL-CIO Labor Day breakfast, held this year just a week before the state's primaries.

Courtesy of New Hampshire Audubon

If you’ve been noticing a lot of dead squirrels on the roads recently, you’re not alone.

New Hampshire has seen a bumper crop of acorns and pine cones in recent years, a key food source for the animals.

James Napoli

It's been a year since an incident in Claremont involving the near-hanging of a young, biracial boy made national news. This week, NHPR is looking at how that event impacted local residents, including the then-superintedent of schools, Middleton McGoodwin. As he tells it, the incident forced him to reflect uncomfortably on his own history with race.

Britta Greene

Wayne Miller is known around Claremont for his work on addiction. He runs a local recovery center, and he has been instrumental in keeping support services in the community for those struggling with opioid use.

He can talk about addiction and recovery “left and right and sideways,” he says. But something he’d rarely spoken about in public before last year is race.

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Governor Chris Sununu and state Health Commissioner Jeff Meyers on Wednesday announced a major overhaul of New Hampshire's addiction treatment infrastructure.

The state will funnel tens of millions in newly available federal funds into a coordinated system of care that tracks patients for months, if not years, through their recovery. The funds, expected to total roughly $46 million over a two-year period, were made available through the federal budget deal earlier this year.

NHPR Staff

An independent organization of Dartmouth College faculty says the school should offer reparations to victims of harassment and abuse, and should investigate how a "hostile climate" was allowed to persist in the psychology department for years. 

Courtesy of Twin Pines Housing

Construction is now officially underway on New Hampshire's first net-zero, multi-family housing project.

Rep. Annie Kuster joined state and local officials for the groundbreaking Wednesday in Lebanon.

The building’s 29 units will not only be energy-neutral, their electric use offset by solar panels, but also affordable. Resident incomes will be capped at about 60 percent of the area median, or about $42,000 for a family of four.

New England has seen a significant increase in heavy rain and snow events in recent years, storms delivering upwards of two inches of precipitation in a single day.

While human-caused warming is a major contributor to that shift, natural climate trends may be playing a role as well, said Jonathan Winter, a professor of geography at Dartmouth College. 

He recently published research looking at specific weather patterns driving precipitation in the northeast since 1996. 

Organizers of the Cheshire Fair in Swanzey have opted not to change vendor policies this year despite earlier outcry over racially charged merchandise.

Photos of a confederate flag and “black flies matter” t-shirts at a booth last summer spread quickly on social media.

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth College is investigating allegations of misconduct by two leaders of The Dartmouth Institute. TDI focuses on healthcare research and is closely associated with the college's medical school.

Elliott Fisher, the institute's director, and Adam Keller, chief of strategy and operations, are on paid leave as of Tuesday.  

The college has not released specifics of the complaint, including whether the alleged misconduct was of a sexual nature.

Saratoga Associates

After years of planning and debate, construction on a wind farm in the town of Antrim is scheduled to begin next week.

Walden Green Energy, the company behind the project, has notified state and local officials that it intends to break ground on or around August 6.

State environmental officials will be in Keene Wednesday morning to talk about air monitoring efforts.

It's their last stop in a series of public tours of monitoring stations around the state.

The Keene area often suffers from poor air quality in winter months.

That's because of its topography, sitting at the bottom of a valley, where pollution from wood smoke can get trapped.

The Claremont Speedway will host a memorial race Friday night for Cody LaFont, the 25-year-old man killed by a city police officer in 2016. 

Federal prosecutors are focusing their efforts on Hillsborough County, including the cities of Manchester and Nashua, in a new crackdown on synthetic opioid dealers.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the effort, called Operation Synthetic Opioid Surge (SOS for short), during a stop in Concord last week.

It’s a nationwide push, targeting a single county in each of 10 districts in the U.S. -- areas that have been hardest hit by the drug crisis.

NHPR File Photo

Bill Kelley, the final of three Dartmouth College psychology professors facing allegations of sexual harassment and discrimination, has resigned.

James Napoli

Dennis Follensbee took a hike in the White Mountains about a month ago. He wanted to get away, to find some peace and quiet. Or, as he puts it, “nature sounds and not people sounds.”

As he climbed out of the valley, the trickling of water from the brook below slowly faded away. The leaves rustled in the trees. But then, all of a sudden, he hit a ridge and everything changed.

“You feel like you’re in the middle of nowhere, pushing through the forest,” he said. “And then you hear the brrrrrruhhhh coming through, all the way from Lincoln, and you’re like, man!”

It turned out it was motorcycle week.  The noise was echoing across his path.

NHPR File Photo

The state health department is hosting a public meeting in Concord a week from today for input on how to allocate a big increase in federal funds toward the opioid crisis. 

The money is coming to the state as part of the most recent Congressional budget deal.

Local officials now have less than a month to decide how it will be spent.

Members of the public can submit feedback by email through July 27. 

Courtesy Ron DiMasi

A bear in Hanover nicknamed "Mink" is now the subject of a second online petition aimed at saving her life.

The first, last year, gained so much attention that Governor Chris Sununu ordered Fish and Game to pardon the animal. At the time, her then-yearlings had gotten into a home in town.

This time around, the petition comes after Mink’s relocation to the North Country. According to the latest update from Fish and Game, she’s covering long distances to try to get home. 

NHPR File Photo

Speaking at the U.S. District Court in Concord on Thursday, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a surge in federal enforcement efforts around synthetic opioids. 

Pages