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Word of Mouth

7.07.15: How Social Media Killed Nostalgia, and A World Without Work

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Seattle Municipal Archives via Flickr Creative Commons
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Social media has killed nostalgia, and iPhones are ruining summer camp. On today's show, we explore how social media has replaced that shoe box in the closet that keeps the past hidden and contained. Then, machines take over for humans and slog through the dirty work, leaving people free to do whatever they choose in a world without work. We talk about what a post-job society might look like, and how we might prepare for it. But meanwhile, the number of older Americans working is on the rise. 

Listen to the full show.

Social Media Killed Nostalgia

Old love letters, faded photographs ... these are being usurped by social media, as memories and photographs (good and bad) are hauled back to the surface. Charlotte Lytton wrote an article for the Ideas section of The Boston Globe called "Social Media Killed Nostalgia."

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Social Media Killed Nostalgia

How iPhones Ruined Summer Camp

Brett Berk is author of the article "How iPhones Ruined Summer Camp" for Vanity Fair, and the book "A Gay Uncle's Guide To Parenting."

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How iPhones Ruined Summer Camp

Rocky Mountain High

 Jeffrey Carpenter talks about his own summer camp experience for the series Song and Memory ... and how the song Rocky Mountain High would never be the same. You can listen to the story again at prx.org.

A World Without Work

A post-job society sounds like a utopia or a set-up for science fiction. Turns out, it might be less futuristic than you would think. Derek Thompson is a senior editor for The Atlantic, where we found his article "A World Without Work."

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A World Without Work

Older Americans, Still Working

For the series Changing Gears, Kate Davidson has the story of how the number of older Americans working full time has been steadily rising. You can listen to the story again at prx.org.

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