Climate Coverage

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Congressman Chris Pappas spoke with The Exchange on a variety of issues including climate change legislation, background checks, and the I-93 expansion.  Here are some highlights from that conversation. 

Listen to the show and read the transcript. 

Arctic.NOAA.gov

Five Democratic presidential candidates in the span of 24 hours have released sweeping plans to address climate change, ahead of a series of town halls devoted to the issue.

On Wednesday, California Sen. Kamala Harris and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg each unveiled their climate plans. New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Obama cabinet member Julián Castro each laid out theirs on Tuesday.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

A new state report says rising seas are on track to cause widespread problems in New Hampshire's coastal communities within decades.

Now, regulators want public input on how the latest scientific findings could guide local resilience planning in the future.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Voters at a presidential campaign forum about climate change Thursday night say the issue still isn't getting enough attention.

The event, at yogurt-maker Stonyfield's factory in Londonderry, featured Ohio Congressman Tim Ryan and former Maryland Congressman John Delaney, both Democrats.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee had been slated to appear, but ended his climate-focused campaign earlier this week.

Voters like Elizabeth Deutsch, a nurse from Vermont, worry the issue will remain sidelined in the race.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 2, 2019

Aug 2, 2019

Voting issues are back in the news with Governor Sununu vetoing two Democratic-backed election law bills. Meanwhile a federal judge gives the go-ahead for two Dartmouth College students to sue the state over increased regulations for student voters. 

The recent heat wave with high humidity and temperatures in the 90s may be  the weather of the future for New Hampshire.  And a bobcat burger burglar is nabbed at a Seacoast drive-through restaurant. 

Flickr Creative Commons / Brave Sir Robin

About 60 people attended a public forum Wednesday night about potential sites for Dartmouth College’s proposed biomass plant.

While some questions focused on the three possible sites for the plant, more audience members challenged the idea of having a biomass plant at all, asking the college to consider solar or other technologies.

The plant is part of Dartmouth's plan to cut its greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2025. The biomass plant would produce energy for a new hot water heating system at the college.

Wikimedia Commons

A new study says New Hampshire and the nation will see far more days with dangerous heat over the coming decades – especially without more action to curtail climate change.

Ruin Raider via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8uzPPU

New research from the University of New Hampshire recommends that the state should invest in thicker asphalt roads. The state's roads are likely to see more damage due to rising temperatures and sea levels.

When asphalt is exposed to hotter springs and summers, it's more likely to crack under the weight of vehicles and create rougher surfaces. Damaged roads can lead to reduced fuel efficiency, more safety hazards and more traffic due to construction and road closures.

The Weather Machine: A Journey Inside the Forecast

Jun 23, 2019
HarperCollins Publishers

In his new book, The Weather Machine, Andrew Blum explores the people, the technology, and the infrastructure behind the weather forecast we rely on day to day, and the role of meteorology in the study of our planet and global policy and decision making. The book is on sale June 25th. 


Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Massachusetts senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren visited voters in Windham and Manchester, New Hampshire on Friday to pitch a plan she says will fight the influence of big corporations and rebuild the middle class.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Presidential candidate Joe Biden used a swing through New Hampshire Tuesday to highlight his new proposal to combat climate change. The former Vice President is embracing what he calls the frameworks of the Green New Deal, including a $1.7 trillion federal investment in climate related policies.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A first-of-its-kind study from UNH shows that slower rates of global warming can make seasonal change more predictable.

The study looked at the period between 1998 and 2012, when global temperatures increased more slowly than in years prior. Scientists still aren't sure exactly why.

Algkalv / Wikimedia Commons

A new study from Dartmouth College shows how warming in the Arctic is rapidly changing an important landscape.

The research, by Ph.D candidate Rebecca Finger Higgens, says lakes in the Arctic tundra are shrinking as global temperatures rise.

Finger Higgens spent a summer in Greenland studying these lakes, which are scattered across a vast glacial landscape of rolling hills and low shrubs.

"It's a place where one degree of temperature change can make a really big difference."

Arctic temperatures have risen around 2.5 degrees celcius since 1985.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

 

Former Texas Congressman and presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke says climate change needs to be more of a priority in the 2020 election. Fresh off a campaign stop in flood-ravaged regions of Iowa, O’Rourke told voters in Hooksett:

“It’s not God. It’s not Mother Nature. It is us - our emissions, our excesses, our inaction in the face of the facts. And we know that this will get exponentially worse over time unless we change course now.”

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Middle schoolers in Portsmouth on Wednesday showcased their ideas to make their city more sustainable – and more prepared for climate change – within the next decade.

The eighth graders based their projects on the United Nations' sustainable development goals – to tackle climate change, inequality, public health issues and more.

The conversation on climate change has a new vigor in recent months, thanks in part to the Green New Deal. Though it was voted down in a procedural vote in the U.S. Senate, the non-binding resolution has intensified conversation on climate and yielded climate policy packages from both sides of the aisle: Republican Rep. Max Gaetz’s Green Real Deal and Senator Lamar Alexander’s A New Manhattan Project.

The Sununu Family And Climate Change Over The Years

Apr 4, 2019

Governor Chris Sununu comes from one of New Hampshire's most prominent political families. His father, John H. Sununu, served as governor and later as chief of staff for former President George H.W. Bush. His brother, John E. Sununu, served as a U.S. congressman and senator. In the latest episode of Outside/In, a podcast about the outdoors, NHPR's Annie Ropeik and Sam Evans-Brown track the Republican Party's views on climate change over the years through the lens of this one political family.

Jim Richman/Flickr

Climate change is a hot topic on Capitol Hill and on the 2020 presidential campaign trail. And it is mobilizing younger Americans: children suing the federal government, grassroots campaigns pushing for the Green New Deal, and student-led walkouts. 

As the legislature weighs net-metering and offshore wind, we talk with young New Hampshire leaders about the state's climate future. 

Josh Carloni / NHFG

Regulators are taking comments on plans to expand a lucrative new crab fishery that’s stirring interest in the Gulf of Maine.

Jonah crabs are a native species that, until recently, was mainly caught as bycatch – by accident – in lobster pots.

Now, as warming waters push the lobster fishery north, more fishermen – especially in southern New England – are targeting Jonah crabs on purpose to supplement their income.

New Hampshire Fish and Game biologist Josh Carloni says in Northern New England and the Gulf of Maine, lobster is still king – but that could change.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

At an annual breakfast Friday in Durham, environmentalists said more federal and local action is needed to slow the effects of climate change.

New Hampshire U.S. Sen. Jeanne Shaheen and Rep. Chris Pappas both spoke at the event, saying climate change demands a local response but poses a global existential threat.

Pappas says the Trump administration should engage more on the issue with other world powers – such as China and India, both top contributors of carbon emissions.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The melty weather in New Hampshire this winter has been a big problem for some kinds of seasonal recreation -- and it’s all part of a long-term warming trend.

As this season comes to an end, some of the region's favorite pastimes are preparing for an uncertain future.

Windblown Cross Country Skiing and Snowshoeing is tucked into the hills of New Ipswich, New Hampshire, not far from the Massachusetts border.

On a bright, brisk Friday in late February, the parking lot is thawing into mud – but the snowy trails that lead into the woods are crisp and freshly groomed.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Students from the Seacoast area participated in Friday’s worldwide Youth Climate Strike, a coordinated event demanding immediate action on climate change.

In Portsmouth’s Market Square, a thick crowd of students from local high schools held up signs, passed around a bullhorn, and called for the end of fossil fuels.

Flickr Creative Commons

As the climate warms, Americans – and New Englanders – appear to be finding abnormal temperatures less and less remarkable.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

New Hampshire drivers may start to notice bumpier roads in this latest thaw after a cold snap – both damage and weather that could happen more often as the climate warms.

Brian Wallstin

Last week's cold snap gives way to much milder temperatures this week.

Climate scientists say it’s all part of a warming trend in New Hampshire – where winters are heating up faster than in most of the rest of the country.

New research shows the state is on the leading edge of an increase in annual low temperatures across the country.  

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Last weekend's winter storm caused only moderate flooding on New Hampshire's Seacoast. But it provided a window into how rising seas will make flooding more frequent, bringing challenges to the state's coastal communities.

DAN TUOHY / NHPR

A new report from Columbia University and First Street Foundation finds that sea level rise and associated tidal flooding have already soaked up value from the coastal New England real estate market.

Researchers say homes have forgone $400 million in relative value since 2005. And in New Hampshire, it has cost homeowners $15 million in lost value.

Hampton Beach Village District

A new report says sea level rise has already cost New Hampshire more than $15 million in coastal property valuation in recent years.

Researchers from Columbia University and the First Street Foundation, a national nonprofit, analyzed 2.5 million coastal homes in four New England states.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

State legislators will consider how to prepare New Hampshire for the effects of climate change this session – including with one bill that would help coastal towns facing rising seas.

Seacoast-area state Senator David Watters spoke at the Seacoast Environmental Film Festival Saturday, after a documentary about sea level rise on the Chesapeake Bay.

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Even if countries cut greenhouse gas emissions immediately, New Hampshire will get warmer and wetter within the next three decades, and towns need to plan accordingly.

That was the topic of Nashua's first Resilient Nashua Summit, which the city hosted Tuesday as part of a year-long initative to gather input on its plan for dealing with natural disasters exacerbated by climate change. 

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