Arts & Culture | New Hampshire Public Radio

Arts & Culture

• Check out our list of New Hampshire museums, galleries, performance venues & independent bookstores, sorted by region.

• You can also find art exhibits, book readings, live music and more on our Public Events Calendar.

Outside/In Presents: The Whalesong Workshop

May 1, 2021
Humpback whales drifting in the blue ocean
Katy Payne

In 1967, Katy Payne and her husband Roger Payne were some of the first people to hear recordings of humpback whale song — and the album they released three years later, Songs of the Humpback Whale, became the best-selling environmental album in history. Now Katy is sharing what she’s learned from 50 years of whalesong observation with a group of Canadian musicians, inviting them to learn from and collaborate with whales.

Ryan W. Smith

When composer and traveling musician Ben Cosgrove was just 7 years old, he wrote a song called “Waves.” Since then, he’s made a career out of music inspired by landscape, place, and wilderness.

But if an artist has an environmental brand... do they also represent an environmental ethic? 

Over the years, Ben began to wrestle with what his music was really saying about the natural world.

Sara Plourde for NHPR

As part of NHPR's week-long focus on artists, we talk with you about what creative projects you've undertaken this last year, and what making art has meant to you. We talk with art educators and creative people from around the state about how they incorporated art into their lives in 2020. 

Read on for art created by our listeners. 

Explore our series, "The Show Goes On: How New Hampshire Artists Emerge from the Pandemic."

Air date: Monday, April 26, 2021. 

Taylor Quimby

A conversation with Sabrina Imbler, science journalist and author of Dyke (Geology), which tells the story of Kohala - the island of Hawaii’s most ancient volcano - and of a break-up, in a hybrid work combining science writing, poetry, and personal essay.

Cyclical Core on Deviant Art

A lot of us may feel like our time and attention is not our own, and can easily disappear into the ether of work and the internet. But rather than merely suggesting a digital detox, artist and writer Jenny Odell presents a third way.

In her book How to Do Nothing: Resisting the Attention Economy, Odell draws on ecology, art, labor history, and literature, to seek a deeper kind of attention: an attention that probes our sense of selfhood, our relationship to place, time, and other species. An attention that reminds us of our being animal on this planet.

2020 Annual Holiday Book Show

Nov 27, 2020

It's our Annual Holiday Book Show, a little earlier than usual given the pandemic’s impact on both the book industry and  how people shop. We ask independent booksellers how they’re approaching both in-person and online sales this holiday season.  And of course we find out what books they recommend for inspiration or a little escape from reality!  How has your reading changed this year? What books are on your list - either for gifting or for reading this winter?

Airdate: Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020

The artist Larissa Fassler is the daughter of an architect, an upbringing which in part explains her own interest in the way residents are shaped by the places they live.

Photo showing inside of empty music call
Courtesy of Tupelo Music Hall

The state is awarding $11.5 million to live music venues, stadiums and theaters as they face financial losses and an uncertain winter of cancelled and limited performances due to the pandemic.

Sean Hurley

In Stark, a small cliffside cemetery has been eroding into the Ammonoosuc for years – and both earth and bones have been lost to the river.

During a special town meeting in mid-September, locals voted thirty-four to one in favor of relocating Blake Cemetery to a new graveyard a few miles up the road and that work has now begun.

NHPR’s Sean Hurley recently visited Stark to find out just how one goes about moving a cemetery.

Players' Ring Theatre

The one-woman show, "Mary and Me" tells a version of a real-life story: that of Ann Lovett, a 15-year-old Irish girl who died during childbirth in 1984 beneath a statue of the Virgin Mary. Her baby also died. The story drew acclaim when it was first performed in Ireland three years ago and now, for the first time, it's coming to the United States. 

The open world environment of Skyrim is beautiful, and one of the most celebrated video game landscapes of all time. But an imagined world can be transformative ... and contain ideas about nature that are quite real.

Rebroadcast: Diversifying Your Summer Reading List

Aug 5, 2020

We revisit our earlier conversation with suggestions for summer reading. Many readers are being intentional about bringing diversity to that stack of books to read. On the Annual Summer Book Show, our independent bookstore owners discussed some anti-racism resources for adults as well as younger ages, and we highlight authors who might have gone unnoticed without recent activism. What’s on your list to read for this summer?

Airdate: Wednesday, August 5, 2020 (originally broadcast on Tuesday, June 30, 2020)

NHPR Calendar of Virtual and Pandemic-oriented concerts, open mics, etc

July 13, 2020 edition

Daily (or every weekday)

Jud Caswell’s Morning Cordial Series ~ https://www.youtube.com/judcaswell or https://www.facebook.com/judcaswellmusic/playlist/429147271282854/ (see also his irregular, hour-long “Evening Cordial” home concert series.

Andre Belanger

 

 

 

New Hampshire artists and arts organizations have been struggling during the pandemic, despite coming up with creative ways to stay afloat, including drive-by art shows.

Speaking on The Exchange, Russ Grazier, CEO of the Portsmouth Music and Arts Center, says shifting to online classes has been successful at the Center, even attracting new students – but that hasn't made up for severe losses in other sources of income, such as concerts, theater productions, and gallery showings.  

Andrei.D40 via Flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/9Ez4ak

Last week on New Hampshire Calling, we had a conversation about the books that are getting listeners through this time of social distancing. You can listen to that show right here.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

There’s a gem of a plot of land in Kensington, in the southeastern corner of the state, that is usually closed to the public.

But with the stress of the coronavirus taking a toll, the owners of the Alnoba property are opening their arms to the community.

Courtesy of Water Street Bookstore

Some people find themselves right now with a lot of extra quiet time in the house. You could  stew. You could tweet. Or, how about you get some reading done? 

Click here to sign up for our newsletter to get the latest updates on coronavirus in New Hampshire delivered to your inbox.  

Kevin Krieger

After winning the “Best Comedy” award at last year’s Melbourne Fringe Festival in Australia, New Hampshire native Gemma Soldati and comedy partner Amrita Dhaliwal are now taking their two-woman clown show, The Living Room, on the road. The show, which they describe as “a comedy about death, devised in grief,” will be touring major cities across the United States, Canada, and Australia.

2019 Annual Holiday Book Show

Dec 4, 2019

The gift-giving season is suddenly upon us, and our independent bookstore owners are back with the best books of 2019 and recommendations for holiday shopping - including for yourself!  What were your favorite books of the year? All the titles that come up in our conversation, as well as our guest picks, will be posted as soon as possible after the show.

Air Date: Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019

Allegra Boverman Photography

Award-winning author Ann Patchett - herself a seasoned literary interviewer - joined All Things Considered & The Bookshelf host Peter Biello to discuss her latest novel, The Dutch House, writing, bookselling, and how much she hates the Amazon Echo. The interview was part of our occasional series, In the Spotlight, produced in partnership with Gibson's Bookstore and the Capitol Center for the Arts.

This interview was taped live at the Capitol Center for the Arts on October 2, 2019. 

Listen to the full interview below.

Courtesy of Paula Martin Group

The Currier Museum is adding a second Frank Lloyd Wright home to its collection.

The museum announced Friday that it purchased the Toufic H. Kalil House on Heather Street in Manchester. The concrete and glass structure is down the street from the Wright-designed Zimmerman House, which the Currier has opened for tours since 1990. 

Selling witchcraft is a business where historical tragedy, the spectacle of Halloween, and modern magic all coexist. And nowhere is that more true than in Salem, Massachusetts.

This is the third and final installment of the Real Witches of New Hampshire, a collaboration between NHPR and New Hampshire Humanities on the Second Greatest Show on Earth.

Earlier this year, news broke about a painting stolen from an art gallery in Meredith. There aren’t many art heists in New Hampshire, which got us interested in learning more about the artist who made the painting.

It turns out his life story is a remarkable one, with detours through the state prison and a 1988 exhibition that would reshape his life.  

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Wikimedia Commons

NHPR's Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley sits down with NH Magazine's managing editor Erica Thoits at the beginning of every month to chat about upcoming events.

Listen to find out what's happening in November:

Events mentioned in the interview:

Justine Paradis

In fewer than three hundred years, New England moved on from witch trials and executions and became a place where people openly call themselves witches.

But there are many ways to practice modern magic.

This is the second episode of The Real Witches of New Hampshire, a collaboration with New Hampshire Humanities.

Photo courtesy of the Soggy Po Boys

Dover-based band the Soggy Po Boys have a new album interpreting the classics of New Orleans jazz. The seven-member band has been bringing jazzy, funky tunes to audiences throughout New Hampshire and up and down the East Coast since 2012. The new album is called "All In Favor."

The band's singer, Stu Dias, sat down with All Things Considered host Peter Biello to discuss the album. 

More information on the Soggy Po Boys and their new album can be found at soggypoboys.com

Sarah Gibson for NHPR

Manchester’s long-shuttered Rex Theater is opening again this week. The revamped theater is owned and operated by the Palace Theater just a few blocks down the street.

Standing on the balcony, Executive Director Chuck Stergioux points to group of technicians and contractors installing lights and the sound system before the Rex opens to the public on Thursday.

Stergioux says the place has transformed since a year ago. With a $1.7 million loan from the city, they installed a new roof and a new floor. But they kept the exposed brick wall.

TheMusicHall.org

It's the last weekend of October. Here are 10 things (plus) things to do in New Hampshire this weekend.

Visit NHPR's calendar for more activities, events and shows. And submit your own via this link.

Sara Plourde, NHPR

This show aired October 27th, 2019 and again October 31st, 2019..   

Songs of madness, murder ballads galore, and some mighty fine Devil's music... hosted by NHPR Producer Emily Quirk. 

You can listen to the full show, here:

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This show features a chat with Jake Brennan, podcast host and author of Disgraceland: Musicians Getting Away with Murder and Behaving Very Badly.**

Rick Ganley / NHPR

Vincent McCaffrey spent three decades selling books on Boston’s Newbury Street. His shop, Avenue Victor Hugo Books, became famous in the city. After it closed, he retailed his vast collection of used books online. 

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