WebHeader_Grove.jpg
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
21 new or upgrading sustainers will unlock $5K for NHPR. Make your sustaining gift today!
The Exchange
Tourism is New Hampshire’s second-largest industry–if you combine the state’s smart manufacturing and high technology sectors (SMHT). It’s also a clear point of intersection between government and industry, with the state maintaining a number of parks, campgrounds, and historical sites, and nearby businesses in turn catering to visitors’ needs. Given this close relationship, the state provides funding to market New Hampshire to potential tourists. Some of the heaviest marketing efforts are concentrated in Boston, Philadelphia and New York City. Canadian tourists, especially Quebeçois, also make up a sizable number of New Hampshire’s visitors. From the business perspective, “tourism” is a broad term. It encompasses hotels, resorts, restaurants, retail, and arts and entertainment, among other things. So while statewide reports may indicate overall restaurant or retail sales are up or down, the story might be very different in New Hampshire’s main tourism communities. For these places, weather, gas prices, currency exchange rates, and whether they draw visitors for outdoor activities, site-seeing, or shopping could all be factors.Summary provided by StateImpact NH

New Hampshire Tourism: What Brings Visitors?

picmonkey_collage.jpg
Quiggyt4, ShellMotorSportsUS, weesam2010
/
Flickr/CC

Maine is known for its lobster and coast, and Vermont for its quaint villages and bucolic scenery. But what draws tourists to the Granite State?  Our visitors are a mixed group – from Nascar fans to rock climbers to those who love tax free shopping.  We’ll find out what pulls people here, and whether the state’s brand could use an update. 

GUESTS:

  • Rick Broussard editor of New Hampshire magazine
  • Jeff Feingold – editor of New Hampshire Business Review  
  • Jamie Trowbridge – president and CEO of Yankee Publishing, Inc.
Related Content