Wildlife & Climate Change | New Hampshire Public Radio

Wildlife & Climate Change

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

At the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in northern New Hampshire, the pandemic broke a decades-long streak of field research. Now, scientists there are adapting with new technology – recording the sounds of the forest, which they hope will transform their long and influential record of a changing world.  


NH Forest Rangers / Twitter

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del lunes 28 de septiembre.  

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Estado reporta 53 nuevos casos de COVID-19, cuatro de estos tienen menos de 18 años

New Hampshire confirmó 53 [cincuenta y tres] casos más de COVID-19 el domingo. Cuatro de estos son de personas menores a 18 [dieciocho]. 

Sean Hurley

The White Mountain Fritillary butterfly can only be found in one place on earth - above 4000 feet in the Presidential Range. A conservation effort is underway to make sure the insect can survive climate change… but scientists have only just begun to learn about the species and how it may be at risk.

As part of NHPR’s reporting project, By Degrees, NHPR’s Sean Hurley joined researchers atop Mount Washington to see four captive butterflies released back into the wild.

Ken Watson / KenWatson.net

A continuación, encuentra las noticias del jueves 17 de septiembre.  

Puedes escucharlas haciendo click en el audio o leerlas.

Una nota: Lo escrito es nuestro guión para nuestras grabaciones. Tenlo en cuenta si ven algunas anotaciones diferentes.

Trabajadores electorales piden ajustes en procesos de emission de papeletas de votos ausente

Los trabajadores electorales dijeron que las recientes elecciones primarias fluyeron bien a pesar de la cantidad de cambios que se realizaron por el COVID-19. 

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Environmental groups want federal regulators to reconsider a new water discharge permit for New England’s largest coal-fired power plant – Merrimack Station in Bow.

The Environmental Protection Agency permit was issued in May after many years of delay.

It dictates how the power plant uses water from the Merrimack River – burning coal to heat the water into steam that generates electricity, before putting that hot water back into the river.

Courtesy N.H. Fish and Game

 

Low snow cover, warm spells this winter, and a mast crop of berries and acorns in the fall have more bears coming out of hibernation, particularly in the southeastern corner of the state.

Dan Bailey, a wildlife biologist with New Hampshire Fish and Game, says they are seeing more winter bear activity this year than usual, with regular sightings in people’s backyards.

Flickr Creative Commons | dotun55

  Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Rich from Hudson, NH asks: “I’ve noticed that last summer I noticed an awful lot of dragonflies in my neighborhood. And they were beautiful and they were much larger. I really liked it, and I wonder if this has something to do with the global warming that we’re experiencing?”