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wildlife

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Part of New Hampshire has entered an extreme drought for only the second time in 20 years.

The extreme conditions center on the Dover area and extend in a circle from Great Bay, to near Concord, up to the Lakes Region.

The rest of the state is in severe drought, with moderate conditions in the Upper Valley and Monadnock Valley. 

The Illustrated Shooting and Dramatic News

On this week's Outside/In, Sam digs into a (shockingly controversial) debate over the now-extinct passenger pigeon, and its reputedly gargantuan flocks. Also: we debunk (and demystify) some coronavirus-related fake news about wildlife.

Listen to the program:

NH Fish & Game

Environmental groups say a new state rule, which has support from the construction industry and could become permanent, puts endangered species at greater risk from development.

For years, state regulation has mandated that development projects “not result in adverse impacts” to a list of more than 50 critters that the state considers threatened or endangered.

Shannon Dooling for NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Fish and Game Department is asking the public to contribute to its annual survey of wild turkey flocks. People who see groups of five or more turkeys from now until the end of March are encouraged to submit information on the N.H. Fish and Game website.

We focus on some of New Hampshire's under-appreciated animals: opossum, porcupine, and fisher. They don't grab headlines like the state's larger wildlife, like moose or bear. In fact, they are often viewed as nuisances. But these mammals play an important role in our ecosystem and have had their own recent struggles, including a fatal fungus affecting porcupines and a decline in fisher populations.

Original Air Date: Monday, Oct. 21, 2019

pixabay

We focus on some of New Hampshire's under-appreciated animals: opossum, porcupine, and fisher. They don't grab headlines like the state's larger wildlife, like moose or bear. In fact, they are often viewed as nuisances. But these mammals play an important role in our ecosystem and have had their own recent struggles, including a fatal fungus affecting porcupines and a decline in fisher populations.

Air Date: Monday, Oct. 21, 2019

Photo by Will Staats/NHFG

We talk with wildlife biologist Kristine Rines.  For three decades, she worked with  New Hampshire Fish and Game as the moose project leader.  We discuss the changes she saw during her tenure, from the ravaging of the moose population due to winter ticks and the changes in the state's habitat and public attitudes.  As a biologist, she worked with many of NH's wild creatures known as charismatic megafauna such as bear and moose.

Air date: Wednesday, October 2, 2019

Mink, the Famous Hanover Bear, Makes Her Way Back Home

May 16, 2019
Courtesy of Patricia Campbell

After a nearly year-long journey, a black bear from Hanover has officially returned to her home range, according to Andy Timmins, bear project leader with New Hampshire Fish and Game.

Vermont Fish and Wildlife

 

University of New Hampshire researchers say they've discovered a new strain of canine distemper virus in wild animals in New Hampshire and Vermont.

Over one year, pathologists diagnosed canine distemper virus infection in eight mammals: fishers, gray foxes, a skunk, a raccoon, and a mink.

Pathologists found all of the animals were infected with a distinct strain of the virus that had been identified only in a single raccoon in Rhode Island in 2004. 

Wikipedia

A proposal to limit coyote hunting in New Hampshire has led to a spirited debate over the abundant animals and their impact on human and wildlife populations.  

As discussed on The Exchange,  HB 442 proposes prohibiting hunting coyotes during pup-rearing season. But the House Fish and Game and Marine Resources Committee voted to recommend that lawmakers reject the bill.  

Our Complex Relationship with Coyotes

Mar 8, 2019
Emdot/Flickr

Have you encountered a coyote in New Hampshire?  Coyotes were absent from the state in the 1800s, and since their presence was noted in 1944, it has grown to include every county.  Known as opportunistic omnivores, we learn more about current management practices of the coyote population, including the most recent proposed legislation in the N.H. House.

The Eastern grey squirrel is a ubiquitous rodent in our area, and increasingly this fall, roadkill. We take them for granted; they've become a frequent topic of conversation mostly due to the notable number of carcasses on the roads. We take a moment to learn about the little creature we live in close proximity to, and find out why they are so plentiful this year and how they fit into the natural world and our environment.

Later in the hour, we get an update on the state's fight to protect the ash tree against the Emerald Ash Borer.

It's a Banner Year for Rodent Roadkill. Here's Why.

Aug 29, 2018
Courtesy of New Hampshire Audubon

If you’ve been noticing a lot of dead squirrels on the roads recently, you’re not alone.

New Hampshire has seen a bumper crop of acorns and pine cones in recent years, a key food source for the animals.

 

A New Hampshire legislative committee said Friday that wildlife officials must gather more public comment on a proposal to expand the trapping rules for snowshoe hares.

The wild rabbits are later released by sporting clubs to be chased by hunting dogs for training purposes and competitive field trials. The proposal would increase the number of permits allowing people to trap the rabbits from six to 10, and extend the season for capturing. The current rule has been in place since 2007.

Courtesy of Chad Witko

Back in January, NHPR ran a story about Kevin, a sandhill crane who was melting hearts in the town of Rollinsford. Despite a leg injury and freezing temperatures, the bird was living its best life in this small town.

With the warmer weather and longer days, Kevin now appears to have flown the coop, leaving behind many a brokenhearted resident.

Mother Bear is Back in Hanover ... But Not for Long

Apr 13, 2018
Courtesy Sarah Lindberg

New Hampshire wildlife officials have a new plan for a bear in Hanover that gave local and state officials the run-around last year.   

Moose Hunt Lottery Opens in New Hampshire

Jan 29, 2018
USFWS David Govtaski

  The moose hunt lottery is now open in New Hampshire.

The 2018 applications must be postmarked or submitted online by midnight on May 25, or delivered to the licensing office at the Fish and Game Department headquarters in Concord before 4 p.m. that day.

Winners will be selected through a computerized random drawing on June 15.

Pixabay

If you see a family of turkeys crossing the road, the New Hampshire Fish and Game Department would like to know. As the summer winds down and young turkeys begin to mature, wildlife officials are reminding residents about their annual citizen science turkey count.

Paul Scott via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8bUHaa

You may have seen ads posted on your community cork board for something called citizen science. It’s a trend in scientific research that allows regular people to help out with professional-grade studies by reporting data about their own backyards.

Tuesday at 6pm in the Draft Sports Bar in Concord, Concord Monitor columnist David Brooks will host the Science Café. He and a panel of scientists will talk about this innovative approach to research, and he spoke with NHPR’s Peter Biello for a preview.

What exactly is citizen science?

NHPR

Normandeau's agency's been swamped by a rising number of hikers needing rescue. We'll talk about that, also continued funding struggles, controversy over gun politics, and Fish and Game's starring role in the TV show "North Woods Law: New Hampshire" on Animal Planet. 


Something Wild: Visiting Wings of the Dawn Wildlife Rehab Center

Mar 10, 2017
Ross Boyd

Something Wild recently visited Maria Colby, director of Wings of the Dawn Wildlife Rehabilitation Center in Henniker.

Peter Roome via flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/ckY7tj

Millennials are less religious than their predecessors—so what does that mean for the future of the abortion issue? On today’s show, the growing number of young pro-life activists who are—or call themselves—secular feminists: the new generation of pro-life activists who are separating themselves from the GOP, and the religious right.

Plus, a new 10-Minute Writer's Workshop with Jodi Picoult. Her newest book carries on her tradition of tackling tough subjects with an ensemble of narrators, and this time, it's race. 

Beavers have been busy this summer, building dams and creating wetlands—in places they're not always welcome. Commercial trappers are getting more calls to remove beavers from neighborhoods this season, and that's due to a drop in international fur prices. When prices for fur drop overseas, the number of beavers in New Hampshire goes up.

Anton Kaska unfolds a beaver trap and wedges it into the swampy ground in a marsh in a Bedford neighborhood. It's designed to catch the beaver around the shoulders and neck.

Bryan Hanson / Morguefile

The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation announced a million dollars in grants Tuesday to restore New Hampshire’s forest and fish habitat.

Eight organizations received funding to restore wildlife habitat in New Hampshire, Vermont, Connecticut, and Maine. Collectively, the groups will open nearly 200 miles of streams for fish passage and improve habitat for the New England Cottontail, American woodcock, and golden-winged warblers.

Eversource, New Hampshire’s largest electric utility, is donating the bulk of the funding.

N.H.'s New Ten-Year Action Wildlife Plan

Dec 3, 2015
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services / Flickr/CC

The state's new ten-year wildlife action plan was announced last month, laying out priorities for New Hampshire's natural resources and critters. We'll look into what the plan entails, and how its used in towns weighing conservation against other considerations.

Guests:

Bow Police via Facebook

An emu famous for running wild through New Hampshire for more than a week has been reunited with its owner and returned home to Vermont, perhaps after recognizing the man's jacket.

The Concord Monitor reports Kermit Blackwood figured it was a long shot that the emu loose in New Hampshire was his bird, Beatrice.

It wasn't until the Townshend, Vermont, resident traveled roughly 80 miles to the Henniker-based nonprofit Wings of the Dawn when he knew for sure.

jjjj56cp via flickr Creative Commons

The bird world quiets down by late summer - but not the American goldfinch, one of the most common backyard birds. September brings the chatter of young goldfinches as they follow their male parent. They beg noisily, perched with head thrown back and trembling wings.

Most songbirds switch their diet to high-protein insects when feeding their young, and they nest earlier when insects are most bountiful. For example, chickadees that keep bird-feeders busy in winter disappear in summer as they forage for insects not birdseed.

www.seacoastsciencecenter.org

New Hampshire wildlife officials are reminding residents that picking up young creatures is both illegal and potentially harmful.

Ashley Stokes heads the Marine Mammal Rescue program for the Seacoast Science Center in Rye. She says only those with special permits can care for wildlife, because improper care can harm or kill wildlife. But some individuals who encounter young harbor seals alone on New Hampshire beaches try to help anyway.

Fish And Game's Glenn Normandeau

May 11, 2015
Kevin Micalizzi / Flickr/CC

Fish and Game Executive Director joins us to discuss his agency's mission, its 150th anniversary, and its wildlife management planning process - including decisions around hunting permits and fishing catch limits.

Why Human Feeding Can Hurt Deer

Mar 24, 2015
Ben Hudson via Society for Protection of NH Forests

Last week, 12 deer were found dead in South Hampton. On Tuesday New Hampshire Fish and Game announced the cause of those deaths: feeding by humans.

Dan Bergeron is a deer project leader with New Hampshire Fish and Game. He joined All Things Considered with more on what happened.

 What were these deer fed, and why was that bad for them?

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