Valley Street Jail | New Hampshire Public Radio

Valley Street Jail

A sign outside Valley Street Jail reads: "Please use door 1034 Willow St. for bails and inmate property exchanges."
Emily Corwin

The COVID-19 pandemic has severely limited the kind of contact incarcerated people have with the outside world. Courts have gone remote, in-person visits have slowed, and communication has become largely virtual throughout the criminal justice system.

When Hillsborough County Commissioner Toni Pappas toured the Valley Street Jail in Manchester last December, as she and fellow commissioners are required to do at least twice a year, she didn’t appear to find any cause for concern.

Zoey Knox for NHPR

The majority of inmates who tested positive for COVID-19 at Valley Street Jail in Manchester are no longer considered infectious and have been cleared from quarantine status.

Zoey Knox / NHPR

Rey DeJesus has been at Valley Street Jail since February, awaiting a trial for felony charges. He and his wife Krystal DeJesus talk on the phone every day, and a few weeks ago, he called to say people in the jail were getting sick.

Zoey Knox

At least 102 inmates at the Valley Street Jail in Manchester have tested positive for COVID-19, over half of the jail's entire inmate population. Twenty-seven staff are also now positive with the virus, and more will be tested later this week.

The facility has faced criticism for its handling of COVID-19 protocols – including mask-wearing, test availability, and quarantine procedures.

NHPR File

A judge has granted bail to an inmate in Manchester’s Valley Street Jail who tested positive for COVID-19.

The New Year’s Eve order from Hillsborough County Superior Court grants home confinement to 37-year-old William Jones, under his mother’s supervision.

Emily Corwin for NHPR

A judge is considering whether an inmate at Valley Street Jail who has COVID-19 should be released on bail, in light of concerns about the facility's management of health and safety during the pandemic.

On Wednesday, Hillsborough County Superior Court Judge Charles Temple heard over three hours of arguments and testimony on the Manchester jail's COVID-19 protocols. Attorney Elliot Friedman argued those protocols endanger the health and life of his client, William Jones.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Attorneys say the state's largest jail is keeping them in the dark on how it is managing COVID-19 risk and potential cases among its inmates and staff. 

NHPR

The family of a man who died last year at a Manchester jail is suing the facility and its medical contractor, alleging substandard care.

The wrongful death and civil rights suit was filed Friday in federal court against the Hillsborough County Department of Corrections, among others.

The suit comes from the mother of Nicholas Sacco, who died at age 24 last May. He had been detained at the Valley Street jail after violating probation with a shoplifting arrest.

Pelham Police

A Manchester man charged with attempted murder is facing an additional charge after allegedly assaulting his public defender.

Dale Holloway was charged with multiple felonies earlier this month after allegedly shooting two people at a wedding in a church in Pelham.

A Conval Regional High School student allegedly involved in a school shooting threat last week is being held without bond in a Manchester jail.

According to police, Anthony Wheeler of Antrim posted a picture on Snapchat last week of another Conval student dressed up like one of the Columbine school shooters and holding guns.

A caption read: "Don’t go to school on Wednesday."

Police have not revealed whether the guns in the photo were real, but all district schools were closed on Wednesday as a result.

File photo

Police are investigating the death of a woman last weekend in a Manchester jail. 

 

Deatrah Reilly, 32, was found dead in her jail cell on Saturday after an apparent suicide.

Her mother, Lorri Moore, says Reilly struggled with drug addiction and depression.

She was arrested on outstanding warrants, including for drug possession. 

 

"She was in Valley Street Jail," says Moore. "Everyone told me leave her there - it will help her, it will save her life."

Credit mikecogh via Flickr Creative Commons

A former doctor at the Valley Street Jail in Manchester is surrendering his medical license after facing accusations of substandard care in the treatment of inmates.

During his seven years overseeing care at the facility, Dr. Matthew Masewic faced a number of federal lawsuits and complaints over his handling of inmate medical needs.

Those included claims that he failed to sign off on needed medications for inmates, failed to maintain adequate medical records and failed to supervise nursing staff.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

Chris Webber was in jail on a couple hundred dollars cash bail the day his daughter was born. He wasn't there because of his trespassing and resisting arrest convictions. He was there because he misses court dates, and he's poor.

Emily Corwin

New analysis of state and county-wide data shows black and Hispanic people are arrested and incarcerated at higher rates in New Hampshire than whites are, and at more disproportionate rates than blacks and Hispanics nationwide.

Michael Burghardt couldn't sleep. His legs were shaking, his bones ached and he couldn't stop throwing up.

Burghardt was in the Valley Street Jail in Manchester, N.H. This was his 11th stay at the jail in the last 12 years. There had been charges for driving without a license, and arguments where the police were called. This time, Burghardt was in after an arrest for transporting drugs in a motor vehicle.

Credit mikecogh via Flickr Creative Commons

The emergency suspension of a physician who oversees the medical needs of more than 200 inmates in Hillsborough County comes after the state Board of Medicine received numerous complaints of substandard care at Valley Street Jail. 

But well before the board launched an investigation into allegations that Matthew Masewic had failed to provide adequate treatment, attorneys for former inmates say medical care at the jail was a problem long before he arrived seven years ago.

Credit mikecogh via Flickr Creative Commons

  A doctor who oversees the medical needs of over 200 jailed inmates in Hillsborough County has been barred from practicing at the facility for at least the next 120 days, after an emergency license suspension by the state’s Board of Medicine

The board claims Matthew Masewic failed to provide his patients at the Valley Street Jail in Manchester with adequate medical care. Its investigation argues that one individual’s heart and other medications were stopped, even after a trip to the ER and subsequent doctors’ orders.