U.S. Supreme Court

Updated at 7:54 p.m. ET

President Trump says he is looking into delaying the 2020 census, hours after the Supreme Court decided to keep a question about citizenship off the form to be used for the head count.

Trump tweeted that he has asked lawyers whether they can "delay the Census, no matter how long, until the United States Supreme Court is given additional information from which it can make a final and decisive decision on this very critical matter."

wikimedia commons

The nation's highest court is completing its term this week, recently handing down rulings addressing free speech, racial discrimination, and the separation of church and state.  We'll look at what these decisions mean -- and what's left to be decided.  Also on the docket: the Trump Administration's addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census and the practice of gerrymandering. 


Weekly N.H. News Roundup: August 24, 2018

Aug 24, 2018

The Granite State's two U.S. Senators call for a delay in the upcoming Supreme Court confirmation hearings. With state primary elections around the corner, a plethera of polls predicts who's up and who's down.   

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire Attorney General’s office is asking businesses that receive sales tax bills from other states to notify them so it can investigate possible scams.

The action comes in the wake of the Supreme Court’s ruling earlier this year that cleared the way for states with a sales tax to require business that sell goods online to collect and remit that tax on their behalf. The Wayfair decision creates concern in New Hampshire, where businesses lack experience collecting a sales tax.

Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

 

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Tuesday said he agrees that the Roe v. Wade decision on abortion rights is settled law, according to Sen. Susan Collins, a Republican from Maine who is a key swing vote on his nomination.

Collins held a two-hour meeting with Kavanaugh in her office that she called "very informative."

NHPR Staff

The Executive Council will vote Wednesday on Governor Chris Sununu’s request for a special legislative session this summer.

The call for a session stems from the Supreme Court’s recent decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair, in which the majority of justices ruled that states that impose a sales tax can require businesses in other states to collect and remit that tax on their behalf.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 29, 2018

Jun 29, 2018

We look at how Supreme Court decisions on union dues and a tax on internet sales may affect businesses here in the state.  More prominent Republican lawmakers are bowing out of state politics.  And, it's not too early to think about tightening up your home for winter - Eversource says rates are going up almost twenty percent. 

Jason Moon for NHPR

This week’s Supreme Court ruling limiting the ability of public sector unions to collect "agency fees" from non-members has landed along predictably partisan lines in New Hampshire. 

Josh Rogers for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu will call lawmakers back to Concord to fight any effort by other states to force New Hampshire businesses to collect sales taxes on customers who buy goods across state lines. 

Updated June 29 at 12:28 p.m. ET

The process of replacing retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy is underway, and the prospect of filling the seat held by the court's swing vote is setting the stage for what is likely to be a battle over abortion rights unlike any in a generation.

Updated at 5:54 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy announced his retirement Wednesday, setting the stage for what promises to be an epic political battle over his replacement.

A Trump nominee is likely to be far more conservative than Kennedy, who, though appointed by President Ronald Reagan, voted with the court's liberals in some key cases.

A Review of Recent SCOTUS Rulings

Jun 24, 2018
wikipedia

It's been a busy few weeks at the U.S. Supreme Court. We'll focus on several recent decisions  addressing online business, digital privacy, religious freedom, and sports betting.  The online-sales ruling in particular has made big waves here in New Hampshire. 

SCOTUS

 

The Supreme Court on Monday struck down a federal law that bars gambling on football, basketball, baseball and other sports in most states, giving states the go-ahead to legalize betting on sports.

The Supreme Court ruled 6-3 to strike down the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act. The 1992 law barred state-authorized sports gambling with some exceptions. It made Nevada the only state where a person could wager on the results of a single game.