U.S. Capitol | New Hampshire Public Radio

U.S. Capitol

Washington, D.C., is in defense mode ahead of Wednesday's presidential inauguration.

Armored vehicles and troops are positioned around the Capitol and other government buildings. Many streets are closed, as authorities brace for protests and potential violence from supporters of President Trump and extremist groups who are threatening another assault like the one at the U.S. Capitol Jan. 6.

National Guard soldiers have been arriving from all 50 states and three U.S. territories.

Governors across the nation are fortifying statehouses amid fears of possibly violent protests in the lead-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday.

Next week's swearing-in of President-elect Joe Biden will see the biggest security presence of any inauguration in U.S. history. For days, thousands of National Guard troops have been pouring into the capital, and by Wednesday's ceremony, up to 25,000 troops will be in place to guard against security threats.

Pease Air National Guard sign
Dan Tuohy / NHPR

About 50 members of the New Hampshire National Guard are heading to Washington to bolster security during the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden.

As NHPR's Josh Rogers reports, Gov. Chris Sununu is backing the deployment, which he said was "to protect and defend democracy."

Speaker Nancy Pelosi
NPR screen capture

President Donald Trump has been impeached by the U.S. House over the violent siege of the Capitol.

He is the only president to be twice impeached. He faced a single charge "incitement of insurrection" in Wednesday's vote after he encouraged a mob of loyalists to, as he put it, "fight like hell" against election results.

U.S. House
house.gov

The U.S. House of Representatives is debating an article of impeachment today against President Trump following the violence at the U.S. Capitol. The article charges Trump with "incitement of insurrection."

As the House debated impeaching President Trump, security was heightened Wednesday all around the Capitol, with barricades set several blocks from the Capitol building and law enforcement and national guard officials checking badges for anyone to enter the perimeter even by foot.

An Amherst man will remain in custody pending a bail hearing after he allegedly left threatening voicemails for members of Congress.

The acting U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia, Michael Sherwin, says "hundreds" of people may ultimately face charges related to the storming of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, which interrupted a session of Congress and left five people dead.

Sherwin spoke with NPR's Martin Kaste in an exclusive interview Saturday evening about the multiagency investigation, the challenges officials face and what they'll be looking for.