Transgender | New Hampshire Public Radio

Transgender

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Transgender youth, their family members, and representatives of a variety of New Hampshire organizations have testified against a bill that would ban transgender girls from competing on girls' sports teams in public high schools and colleges, saying it is discriminatory and unconstitutional.

Courtesy photos

Ty is a 22-year-old who grew up in Manchester and, like a lot of New Hampshire voters, got involved in politics at a young age. They phone-banked and canvassed for Bernie Sanders’ campaign as a high school student in 2016; they also cast their first vote the same year. And as the 2020 general election approaches, Ty’s eager to head back to the polls.

courtesy of Franklin Pierce University

Franklin Pierce University has rescinded its transgender participation and inclusion policy, as part of a resolution agreement to settle a federal complaint filed against the school. 

In 2018, Franklin Pierce established a policy that would allow transgneder women to compete on women’s teams after one year of hormone treatment, including testosterone suppression. 

Peter Biello/NHPR

Novelist Alex Myers came out as transgender in the mid-90s, when society's understanding of what it means to be transgender was less clear than it is today. 

In his new novel, "Continental Divide," Myers writes about 19-year-old Ron, who was born female, and grew up in Tamworth, New Hampshire. Ron decides to reinvent himself as a man by moving west to work on a ranch in Wyoming. Alex Myers is an English teacher at Philips Exeter Academy. NHPR's Peter Biello stopped by his classroom earlier this week to talk about "Continental Divide," and the challenge of coming out as transgender. 

A Conversation With Transgender Granite Staters

May 15, 2019

On Thursday, May 16th, The Exchange talks to three members of the New Hampshire transgender community who have participated in "Ask A Trans Person Anything" panels held around the state. It has been one year since New Hampshire passed a law that protects against discrimination based on gender identity, and there is more conversation nationally and in New Hampshire around transgender issues. 

Dan Tuohy / NH Public Radio

 

Transgender residents and those who don't identify as either male or female would be allowed to change their name and sex information on their birth certificates under a bill passed by the New Hampshire House this week.

The bill would require an applicant to get notarized statements from health care providers stating that in the provider's opinion, an individual is male, female or neither and is reasonably expected to continue as such for the foreseeable future. New birth certificates would be issued, but the original certificates would also be kept.

Kim Cummings

Sometimes, the clothes hanging in the closet hold dreams about who we could become.

Yes to the Dress

Jan 18, 2019

Five people invite us to take a peek into their closets and tell us what's inside.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

The state House of Representatives put transgender rights one step away from the governor's desk Wednesday.

Lawmakers voted 195-129 to send the Senate a bill adding gender identity to existing state anti-discrimination laws.

New Hampshire would be the last New England state to do so.

N.H. State House
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

New Hampshire lawmakers are again voting on whether to expand the state's anti-discrimination law to include transgender people.

The House is set to vote Wednesday on a bill that would ban discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodations based on someone's gender identity in addition to the protections that already exist based on sex, religion and sexual orientation. Lawmakers tabled a virtually identical bill last year, leaving New Hampshire the only New England state without such protections.

Jason Moon for NHPR

A public hearing was held Wednesday for a bipartisan bill that would create legal protections for transgender people.

The hearing drew such a crowd that it had to be moved to Representatives Hall. The large, stately room that seats 400 was mostly full.

NHPR Staff

Backers of a bill to include “gender identity” in the state’s anti-discrimination statute are holding a rally in Concord Wednesday in advance of a scheduled public hearing.

The measure - House Bill 1319 - would expand protections for transgender people in areas of employment, housing and public accommodations. The state’s anti-discrimination law currently includes factors such as age, race, religion and national origin.

Jason Moon for NHPR

It was a packed house at the Teatotaller café in Somersworth as five transgender panelists shared their stories and took questions from an audience.

N.H. State House
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Next legislative session, New Hampshire lawmakers will again debate whether to include “gender identity” under the state’s anti-discrimination laws.

New Hampshire statute currently bars discrimination based on factors including age, race, religion and national origin. Last year, the GOP-majority in the New Hampshire House narrowly voted down a bill that sought to add gender identity to the list.

A student claims the private, Christian school he's attended since kindergarten has told him he's no longer welcome because of his gender identity.

Seacoast Media Group reports  that Stiles Zuschlag transferred to a Maine public high school for his senior year after he was told he was no longer welcome at New Hampshire's Tri-City Christian Academy. Zuschlag, a transgender teen, said he was told he should consider homeschooling or counseling.

Tri-City Christian Academy administrator Paul Edgar declined to speak about Zuschlag's case citing privacy issues.

Britta Greene / NHPR

Tony Strat stands in the grass outside his screen-printing studio in the Upper Valley, washing the ink off of used screens with a hose. Even though he’s scrubbed the screens down, shadows of  designs he’s printed are still visible. “Gender is a social construct,” one of them reads.

Strat, 26, is an artist, entrepreneur and athlete. He’s worked in finance and started his own skateboarding company. He's also transgender. He started his transition process last year.

Jason Moon for NHPR

Governor Chris Sununu says he disagrees with President Donald Trump’s decision to ban transgender people from serving in the armed forces. In an interview Thursday afternoon, Sununu said anyone who is physically and mentally fit should be able to serve in the U.S. military.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

There was no shortage of reaction – much of it critical – in New Hampshire to President Trump’s announcement via Twitter Wednesday morning that transgender people would no longer be able to serve in the U.S. military.

The announcement reserves a decision made by the Obama administration last year. Trump administration officials couldn’t say Wednesday afternoon whether this means transgender people currently serving would be forced out.

Peter Biello

The Bookshelf from NHPR is New Hampshire Public Radio's series on authors and books with ties to the Granite State.  All Things Considered host Peter Biello features authors, covers literary events and publishing trends, and gets recommendations from each guest on what books listeners might want to add to their own bookshelves. If you have an author or book you think we should profile on The Bookshelf, send us an email. The address is books@nhpr.org.

Wikimedia Commons

Keene joined ten other towns in the state Thursday by passing an anti-discrimination protection for transgender city employees. 

Keene City Council voted unanimously to add gender identity and gender expression to the list of factors in their city employee anti-discrimination policy.

Councilwoman Bettina Chadbourne was one of the co-signers on the resolution request. She says it was clear to her and her fellow council members that the transgender population was particularly vulnerable.

  Officials in the city of Lebanon have adopted a policy that protects the city’s transgender employees from discrimination.

City councilors unanimously approved the change at a meeting Wedneday night. It applies to all municipal employees and volunteers, as well as contractors hired to do work for the city. 

Mayor Sue Prentiss says the policy sends a clear message.

“This is about equality and justice. I would like to think that there was never a point that anybody would be treated differently, but that’s not realistic.”

Transgender: Exploring Gender Identity

Mar 30, 2017
Wikimedia Commons

Many people struggle with basic questions about gender and labels, including the concept of a transgender identity. While debate around recent legislation has brought the issue into the spotlight, social media and the internet have played a key role in shifting the culture's perspective on gender for several years.

On this edition of The Exchange, we'll look at the terms, the biology, and the emotional aspects of gender identity.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A bill that would add gender identity to New Hampshire’s anti-discrimination laws was all but killed by the Republican controlled House Thursday without debate.

But it wasn't easy, as the bill’s fate was in doubt for much of the day.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: March 10, 2017

Mar 9, 2017

The N.H. legislature had a full calendar this week, debating changes to the state’s election laws, transgender rights and marijuana decriminalization.  N.H.'s congressional delegation reacts to President Trump's revised travel ban, and assesses the impact in  N.H, and U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions makes a surprise visit to an N.H. youth summit on opioid abuse.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire House has voted 187 to 179, along near party lines, to table a bill that would extend anti-discrimination protections to people who are transgender in employment, housing and public accommodations.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The New Hampshire House worked its way Wednesday through dozens of bills.

Among the measures approved are proposed changes to the state’s drug laws and public school funding.

NHPR’s Paige Sutherland has been covering Wednesday’s session and joins All Things Considered Host Peter Biello from the Statehouse in Concord.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

House lawmakers are considering a bill that would prohibit discrimination based on gender identity. A vote could come during today’s full House session.

But what do we know about what legal protections are already in place for New Hampshire’s transgender community?

Joni Esperian, executive director of the New Hampshire Commission for Human Rights, joined NHPR's Morning Edition to talk about the issue.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

The top Republican in the New Hampshire House says he fears long-term harm if New Hampshire joins twenty other states – including Massachusetts, Vermont, and Maine – in extending non-discrimination protections in housing, employment and public accommodations to people who are transgender.


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

New Hampshire's Republican House leadership is looking to stall legislation that adds protections for transgender people over fears that it would let men use women's bathrooms.

Speaker Shawn Jasper says he's pushing to table the bill at Wednesday's session, meaning it wouldn't be debated. The bill would ban discrimination in employment, housing and public accommodations based on someone's gender identity. The same protections already exist based on sex, religion, sexual orientation and other factors.

NHPR Staff

House lawmakers are to set to vote on a bill this week that would add gender identity to the state’s anti-discrimination laws.

Pages