Tom Steyer | New Hampshire Public Radio

Tom Steyer

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

It's the final stretch before the first primary ballots will be cast in New Hampshire, and candidates are crisscrossing the state to make their final case to voters here. Bookmark this page for updates on what the candidates are up to in these final days, what Granite State voters are saying, and more.

Click here for Part 2 of our Primary Countdown Blog.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

When it comes to abortion rights support, there is little daylight between the Democrats running for president. That much became clear quickly at the ‘Our Rights, Our Courts’ forum in Concord Saturday sponsored by several abortion-rights groups including the Center for Reproductive Rights.

You can’t outscroll them.

Political ads are bombarding social media in New Hampshire right now, as presidential candidates try to squeeze in as much digital facetime as they can in the lead up to Tuesday’s primary.

  

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

In their effort to woo voters before next month’s primary, Democratic Presidential candidates have come out with an array of policy plans, including ones to revitalize the rural United States. NHPR’s Sarah Gibson has been looking at what these plans might mean for rural New Hampshire and talking to voters about their concerns.

Tom Steyer was interviewed this week on The Exchange Candidate Forum, a collaboration between New Hampshire Public Radio and New Hampshire PBS.

Ahead of the hour-long interview, the Democratic presidential hopeful was asked to give his "elevator pitch" — while he was actually in the elevator — on why he should be President.

Dan Tuohy | NHPR

Tom Steyer may want to get money out of politics, but the billionaire former hedge fund manager has spent about $47 million of his own money getting himself noticed in the 2020 primary. 

He’s run more than three quarters of all the presidential TV ads so far. And that’s not counting social media, where he also appears frequently.

At a New Hampshire Public Radio forum Monday, Steyer said it’s been necessary, despite grumblings from some fellow Democratic candidates.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Democratic presidential candidate and former hedge-fund manager Tom Steyer sits down for an hour-long candidate forum in front of a live audience at New Hampshire Public Radio.

Air date: Monday, October 28, 2019. 

Todd Bookman/NHPR

2020 presidential hopeful Tom Steyer made his first swing through the state since announcing his candidacy earlier this month. The billionaire from California met with members of the New Hampshire Young Democrats in Manchester on Tuesday, where he called for a gloves off approach to defeating Republicans.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

Billionaire Democratic activist and campaign donor Tom Steyer spoke to a crowd of supporters in Bow Wednesday night about his campaign to impeach President Donald Trump.

 

Steyer calls it the "Need to Impeach" campaign and says he has more than five million signatures in support.

 

The former hedge fund manager has funneled some $40 million into the effort so far. Steyer pointed to what he calls Trump's obstruction of justice and business dealings with foreign governments as grounds for impeachment.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

  Tom Steyer, the billionaire who poured more than $70 million into an effort to make climate change a top issue in the 2014 elections, was back in the Granite State Friday.

He toured Conner Bottling Works in Newfields, a soda-maker which covered its roof in solar panels.

“Why come all the way from California to New Hampshire?” he said in response to a reporter’s question during a round-table, which elicited chuckles from the crowd.

“Other than the beautiful day, the great business and the charming people, is that your question?” he joked.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

  Environmental issues have never ranked high on the list of issues that drive most voters to the polls. But this year, Tom Steyer – a former hedge fund manager and billionaire – has pledged to spend $50 million dollars in a few key races around the country, hoping to make climate change a central issue. This spending begs a question: can talking about global warming actually win elections?

Steyer’s operation in New Hampshire, NextGen Climate, has 24 full-time staff, and 5 field offices with two more slated to open in the coming weeks.