tariffs

Via Atlas PyroVision's Facebook page

President Trump has said that an increase in tariffs on Chinese goods would boost manufacturing and bring jobs back to the United States.

Stephen Pelkey, CEO of Jaffrey's Atlas PyroVision Entertainment Group in Jaffrey, says that for industries like his, this is not easy to do. Atlas is the largest fireworks company in New England.

Hundreds of business are in D.C. opposing tariffs this week, so how will trade discussions with China and Mexico, among other places, impact New Hampshire?  Also, we have a preview of the state's lucrative summer tourism season, and discuss what the Federal Reserve might do with interest rates. 

Ali Oshinskie/NHPR

Andrew Yang could give his platform on Universal Basic Income in his sleep: he’s been widely covered on the impacts of automation and technology on the American workforce and how he plans to solve those issues through a “Freedom Dividend” and value-added tax. But on key social issues like gun-control and abortion, Yang hasn’t had as much air time.

NHPR Host Peter Biello asked Yang on The Exchange about his signature platforms and less popular policies for the tech entrepreneur running his first campaign for public office. Read selected excerpts from the interview below; they have been edited for clarity.

[Listen to the full conversation here.] 

In 2019, we make a tentative forecast of the economic trends to watch in the new year. From continued affordable housing challenges in New Hampshire, to tariffs and stock market fluctuations internationally, we look at what indicators you should keep an eye on. 


Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Job growth in the Granite State is still healthy - while wage growth remains slow.  Consumers seem in the mood to spend, but some local retailers say they lack shoppers.  And New Hampshire's housing crunch just gets tighter -- especially for renters.

Robert Garrova for NHPR

Senator Jeanne Shaheen visited the Londonderry maker of honey wines Moonlight Meadery today. She stopped by to illustrate how local companies are impacted by the Trump administration's trade policies.

Distillery owner Michael Fairbrother says he was working on a deal with China that would have almost doubled his revenue. But thanks to retaliatory tariffs from China, Fairbrother says he's lost $750 thousand dollars in sales. 

Auntjojo/Flickr

We get a New Hampshire take on two national issues.  First, your questions on President Trump's Supreme Court nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh.  A UNH constitutional law expert explains the process. Then, the ramifications of battles over trade: on New Hampshire manufacturers, consumers, workers, and our economy overall.  

Ian Lamont

We look at two economic forces that directly impact each other: international trade and the stock market. What do trade announcements from Washington mean for New Hampshire, and how does a fluctuating stock market impact our economy? We'll also look at a big employer for Granite Staters: foreign companies.

Todd Bookman / NHPR

President Donald Trump announced this week his plan to impose stiff tariffs on steel and aluminum imports. Gov. Chris Sununu joined many federal government officials in opposing the plan.

Val Zanchuck is the CEO of Graphicast, a manufacturing company in Jaffrey. Morning Edition Host Rick Ganley spoke with Zanchuck about how the proposed tariffs could affect his business.


Meg Kelly; NPR

NPR's senior editor and correspondent for the Washington Desk, Ron Elving, joins us to talk about the biggest news in our nation's capital this week, including President Trump's trade announcements, the resignation of the President's top economic advisor, Gary Cohn, and more. 

Julian- / Flickr Creative Commons

Some New Hampshire business owners say the Trump administration's new tax on imported solar panels will slow the growth of residential solar use in the Granite State.

The tariff starts at 30 percent and drops 5 percent in each of the next three years. It's not as severe as Trump could have imposed, and it’s meant to boost the American solar manufacturing industry.

Jaksmata/Wikimedia Commons

Earlier this week, the Trump Administration announced it will raise tariffs on lumber imported from Canada. The move comes in response to claims that the Canadian Government is providing unfair subsidies, which help undercut American producers. For home builders and saw mills in New Hampshire, the announcement is prompting very different reactions.