squirrels | New Hampshire Public Radio

squirrels

Robert Taylor via Flickr

You may be familiar with hoarders (not the TV show, but same idea).  In nature, a hoarder will hide food in one place.  Everything it gathers will be stored in a single tree or den.  But for some animals one food cache isn't enough.  We call them scatter hoarders.

  

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

It’s the year of the squirrel in New England. The animals have never had so much fame, never been the subject of so much attention.

It’s partly because they’ve put themselves in the spotlight—or in our headlights might be more accurate. Their populations have boomed in recent years, fed by a glut of acorns, and now they’re running across roads en masse in search of more food.

The thing is, all these squirrels aren’t just affecting our highways. They’re getting into houses as well. 

Robert Taylor via Flickr

 

This year's large number of squirrels are not just frustrating drivers around the region, but also farmers as the harvest season continues. 

 

[It's a Banner Year for Rodent Roadkill. Here's Why]

 

From Maine, across New Hampshire and Vermont, farmers are reporting significant damage to crops.

 

The Eastern grey squirrel is a ubiquitous rodent in our area, and increasingly this fall, roadkill. We take them for granted; they've become a frequent topic of conversation mostly due to the notable number of carcasses on the roads. We take a moment to learn about the little creature we live in close proximity to, and find out why they are so plentiful this year and how they fit into the natural world and our environment.

Later in the hour, we get an update on the state's fight to protect the ash tree against the Emerald Ash Borer.

Flickr Creative Commons | Mark Moschell

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Robert Taylor via Flickr

You may be familiar with hoarders (not the TV show, but same idea).  In nature, a hoarder will hide food in one place.  Everything it gathers will be stored in a single tree or den.  But for some animals one food cache isn't enough.  We call them scatter hoarders.

Robert Taylor via Flickr

You may be familiar with hoarders (not the TV show, but same idea).  In nature, a hoarder will hide food in one place.  Everything it gathers will be stored in a single tree or den.  But for some animals one food cache isn't enough.  We call them scatter hoarders.

Bet You Didn't Know It's Squirrel Appreciation Day

Jan 21, 2016
Logan Shannon / NHPR

One of the tasks I take on as producer of Word of Mouth is updating the monthly calendar. This typically involves adding major holidays and upcoming events for the show on a big whiteboard, but I have taken it upon myself to add in the more obscure - and often absurd -  holidays that seem 100% made-up.

Did you miss out on “International Skeptics Day” (January 13th) because you were too busy celebrating “Make Your Dream Come True Day”? (The latter is also January 13th, for some reason.)

Marko Kivelä via flickr Creative Commons

We love answering listener's questions and recently we received one that is a common query at both the Audubon and the Forest Society.

Why is it that some years there are tons of acorns and other years hardly any?

Robert Taylor via Flickr

You may be familiar with hoarders (not the TV show, but same idea).  In nature, a hoarder will hide food in one place.  Everything it gathers will be stored in a single tree or den.  But for some animals one food cache isn't enough.  We call them scatter hoarders.

Marko Kivelä via flickr Creative Commons

We love answering listener's questions and recently we received one that is a common query at both the Audubon and the Forest Society.

Why is it that some years there are tons of acorns and other years hardly any?

The latter half of February begins the onset of peak breeding season for many furbearers and rodents. At Valentine's Day, tracks in the snow increase exponentially as wild mammals seek available mates.