squam lake | New Hampshire Public Radio

squam lake

Will Strathmann

Conservation groups in the Squam Lakes region want residents to turn off their lights and watch the stars for an hour Saturday night.

The event marks the 60th anniversary of the Squam Lake Conservation Society.

People in the Squam Lakes--or anywhere--are invited to turn off all artificial lights starting at 9 p.m. It should reduce light pollution and let features like the Milky Way and more stars become visible.

Chuck Taylor / Flickr Creative Commons

The state is setting new limits on eating fish from Squam Lake after some species were found to contain high levels of a likely carcinogen.

The Department of Environmental Services says it found PCBs in small-mouth bass and yellow perch from the lake.

Past research had shown high levels of the toxic industrial chemicals in loon eggs and sediment from the lake. 

Now, DES says people should limit consumption of these fish -- even further than they would under normal state guidelines.

Courtesy Duncan C via Flickr/Creative Commons.

At Something Wild we like to talk about some of the interesting wildlife or natural occurrences you can find in New Hampshire. We hope you learn a little something wild along the way; sometimes that’s birds and bees, sometimes that’s flowers and trees, but today we want to talk about that thing called love. 

Sean Hurley

It’s the fourth year of the Squam Ridge Race in Holderness – a 12-mile run over Mount Percival and along the rocky ridge overlooking the Lakes Region.  NHPR’s Sean Hurley ran this year’s race and sends us this audio postcard.

Courtesy Ias-initially via Flickr/Creative Commons

At Something Wild we like to talk about some of the interesting wildlife or natural occurrences you can find in New Hampshire. We hope you learn a little something wild along the way; sometimes that’s birds and bees, sometimes that’s flowers and trees, but today we want to talk about that thing called love. 

New Hampshire Fish and Game Department officers and a wildlife rehabilitator have nursed a juvenile bald eagle back to health.

The healthy bird was released in Squam Lake's Long Island last week, near its nest.

The Eagle-Tribune reports a conservation officer rescued the bird in August. It had a broken leg, possibly caused by falling out of the nest or having a rough landing while learning to fly.