solar power

What's Next for Renewable Energy Projects in N.H.?

Aug 7, 2019
Amy Quinton for NHPR

The recent defeat of Northern Pass was a major setback for the import of large-scale hydropower into the region.  Meanwhile, efforts to build more solar and wind power are still underway… and some towns and cities have set their own renewable goals. We'll look at the reliability of these technologies… and  talk about their role in the future of our region’s power grid. 

NHPR Photo

Eversource is rolling out its third energy pilot project in two weeks – this one, on solar power for low-income residents.

The utility, which is preparing to negotiate a rate hike with the Public Utilities Commission, says this proposal will be a new way for those residents to save money.

Solar arrays can deliver savings in the form of net metering – where users sell the solar power back to the grid, in exchange for lower bills.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

A new kind of solar array has begun to pop up in New Hampshire in the past few years.

It's known as a low-income solar project: Grants and donations pay the up-front installation cost, and the savings the array generates go straight to low-income residents.

Town meeting voters in Milford will decide Tuesday whether to green-light one of the largest proposed solar arrays in the state. New Hampshire-based developer Granite Apollo wants to build the 20-megawatt array just off Route 101 in Milford.

The proposed site is on Perry Road, on land the town purchased for future economic development nearly 20 years ago.

Milford officials say they could earn more than $6 million in revenue from the large solar project. But neighbors have raised concerns about its effects on wetlands and wildlife at the site.

Raysonho, Grid Engine / Wikimedia commons

New Hampshire regulators have given Liberty Utilities final approval to test a first-of-its-kind home battery storage project.

Liberty will sell Tesla Powerwall batteries to 500 of its customers in Southeastern New Hampshire and the Upper Valley.

Spokesman John Shore says the batteries will charge overnight, storing power when demand and rates are lowest. They can also be charged with solar power installed at the user's home.