social media

In her new book, Sharenthood, UNH Law Professor Leah A. Plunkett takes on the digital age of parenting and the excessive sharing of children's images and data online. Plunkett urges adults to think before they click, to understand the risks of sharing chldren's digital information and what some protective measures might be. 

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Residents in Epping say their schools need to encourage acceptance of all kinds of political speech, in the wake of a controversy at the high school earlier this month.

At least 100 people came to a forum about the incident, centered on a a student's pro-Donald Trump T-shirt, during Thursday night’s school board meeting.

New York University Press

In her new book, The Identity Trade: Selling Privacy and Reputation OnlineUNH assistant professor Nora Draper explores how notions of privacy have changed in the digital era, and how our personal information and online behavior can be used as a currency. We discuss how much control we have over our personal information online, and how a consumer privacy industry has grown in the social media age. 

We Put N.H. Legislators Up To The #TenYearChallenge

Jan 18, 2019
Courtesy

You may have noticed a trend on social media the past few weeks: the #TenYearChallenge. Some celebrities have taken the opportunity to #humblebrag about how much they’ve “aged,” others have speculated about facial recognition conspiracies.

 

But we noticed some New Hampshire legislators haven’t taken the challenge yet so we did a little emailing to see if they'd be game.

Marlborough Police Department

When cops go online, sometimes they make jokes. 

The Loneliness Epidemic

Jun 26, 2018
Diego Torres Silvestre; Flickr

Loneliness can have a powerful impact on our mental, physical, and social wellbeing. We look at what might be causing loneliness in children, teenagers, and adults, and what it means for our health and happiness.

Peter Biello/NHPR

On a recent morning at Londonderry Senior High School, students filed into Corrine Murphy's mass media class. 

"Good morning, Ms. Murphy."

"What," she laughed, "Ms. Murphy?"

These seniors are showing off a little bit for the microphone. They usually call her something less formal, like Murph. She's friendly with her students in part because she regularly talks to them about something close to their hearts: Social media.

Some Twitter users in New Hampshire felt special today.  For them, #newhampshire was the number one trending topic on the social media platform.  What followed was a mini tweet-storm of confusion.

Creative Commons

New Hampshire’s Attorney General is joining 37 other states in requesting more information from Facebook about how it handles its users’ data.

Gordon MacDonald signed on to a letter sent on Monday to Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. It comes in response to reports that data for at least 50 million Facebook accounts may have been misused by third-party companies.

The Grafton Superior Court will hear a motion to dismiss a much-publicized case involving a swastika-printed flour sack in an antiques store in Littleton, New Hampshire Tuesday. 

In November, Katherine Ferrier took a picture of the flour sack and posted it to Facebook, writing as part of a long post, "How do you think it’s okay to hang this thing here, front and center, given everything it stands for?"

Pexels

We can now live-stream events through programs like Facebook Live and YouTube, turning us all into potential quasi-celebrities. But what are the ethical implications of sharing our personal lives or even criminal acts online? How has the role of bystander changed in the digital era, and how should social media companies deal with objectionable material? 


Jenn and Tony Bot via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8aVSNW

Social media networks have too few people to monitor and shut down the volume of Islamic State propaganda accounts. Today, a Dartmouth professor has created a tool to flag violent, extremist videos and recruitment tools and keep them off social media feeds...still, some companies fear accusations of censorship.

And, an experienced philosophical take on a question that family, fortune and circumstance once made non-negotiable, and is now is the province of self-help books and fortune tellers... How do you choose a partner in a culture where everything is available and laid out like a superstore?

An elite New Hampshire prep school reeling from the conviction of a former student for sexual assault is hosting a symposium on youth and technology with the goal of publishing a guidebook on social media to help schools.

Eli Duke via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/bqQp3T

No bullying, no questionable photos, no posting after hours. When it comes to social media, parents often set strict rules for their kids, but ignore the same guidelines themselves . Today, why kids want more rigid boundaries for what their parents post online.

Plus, a new federal guideline requires schools to test students for at least one non-academic measure... Traits like empathy, self-control, and one important quality that education scholars are calling "grit".  Put how do you score on a child's personality?

Plus, a conversation with James Felice of the folk and country-rock band, the Felice Brothers.

When you imagine the daily tasks of a farmer in New Hampshire, scheduling Facebook posts probably doesn’t come to mind. But it turns out that social media skills have become an important part of the modern farmer’s resume.

Inside a large reception hall at Alyson’s Orchard in Walpole, about fifty farmers from around the Monadnock Region gather for a meeting of the minds. But they’re not here to talk about the growing season, the price of grain, or animal husbandry -- though that sort of thing does come up.

Jason Michael via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/9fEAzN

Baby Boomers like to thumb their nose at Millennials for being entitled narcissists who refuse to grow up, and Millennials tend to poo-poo the Boomers because they're out of touch old folks. But one group seems to get left out of the conversation entirely. Today, what ever happened to Generation X?

Then, many people would rather just say nothing than take a stab at saying something shallow, boring, or potentially offensive, but small talk does have its merits. So what are they? 

Jason Howie via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/d41HES

More than 75 million people use Instagram each day. Sure, there are celebrity selfies and cute kitty pictures, but it's also an unprecedented glimpse into the lives of others on a global scale. On today’s show, a Dartmouth journalism professor considers Instagram as journalism -- documenting lives from the ground up. 

Also today, what's the point of being internet famous if you can't pay the bills? We’ll talk to a YouTube star about the sad economics of internet celebrity.

Brian Wilkins via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/8dp2Hq

Last month China ended its controversial one-child policy – but is the change as radical as it’s been made out to be by officials and news outlets? Today, a reporter on China's new "two-child policy"... and why the country really needs to focus on sex-ed. Plus, Millennials are sometimes derided as a generation slacktivists, and don't have the spending power of their elders – but non-profits are betting on them for the future. From socially conscious spending, to gimmicky donation challenges, we explore how Millennials are changing the face of charitable giving.

Tracking Presidential Candidates on Social Media

Oct 22, 2015
Allegra Boverman / NHPR

We're looking at the proliferation of political speech in this tumultuous presidential season, and its impact on voters.  We’ll examine how campaigns and voters are navigating this brave new world of media, including the vast and sometimes viral dimension of social media -- and explore its implications for our democracy.

GUESTS:

•  Lara Brown  - Graduate School of Political Management’s Political Management Program Director and an associate professor at George Washington University
 

SoxFanInSD via Flickr CC / flic.kr/p/pWJZT7

We think of Coca-Cola as the quintessential American soda – so why then are so many people embracing a foreign variation on the brand? We explore the myth of a healthier, more authentic brand of coke. Plus, a Millennial author comes up with a counter-intuitive theory about why 20-somethings are so obsessed with taking pictures of their food. And, a report on how and why local law enforcement agencies from Ferguson, Missouri to Keene, New Hampshire have stocked up on armored vehicles and other military gear.  

joeshoe / Flickr/CC

As internet natives, brought up in the digital age, today’s young activists are increasingly turning to online platforms to organize and communicate. From Occupy Wall Street to Black Lives Matter to the ALS ice bucket challenge, social movements have begun to enlist the mobilizing force of social media.

Esther Vargas via Flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/h4rhH9

Showing up to work ill is an affliction -- it even plagues doctors. On today's show, we talk about why doctors don't take sick days. But soon, even going to the doctor may become part of the virtual reality lifestyle, as the use of telemedicine increases. Today, we also have an audio postcard from Madison, New Hampshire, from a weekend celebration of E.E. Cummings. Then, screeching fans, long bus rides -- sounds like a boy band on the road. Not exactly. We'll take a look behind the scenes of DigiTour, where stardom is measured not by number of records sold, but by number of followers on Instagram or Vine. And finally, we talk Statute Of Limitation laws to better understand the sexual assault cases against Bill Cosby. 

Seattle Municipal Archives via Flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/7N6MpX

Social media has killed nostalgia, and iPhones are ruining summer camp. On today's show, we explore how social media has replaced that shoe box in the closet that keeps the past hidden and contained. Then, machines take over for humans and slog through the dirty work, leaving people free to do whatever they choose in a world without work. We talk about what a post-job society might look like, and how we might prepare for it. But meanwhile, the number of older Americans working is on the rise. 

Aslak Raanes via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/4LD1Y

Today, hell can mean a bad day, other people, or a threat to sinners, but it wasn’t always so. On today’s show: how hell has evolved, from a place of flaming torture, to tangible horrors here in the real world. Then, when Comedy Central announced Trevor Noah as the new host of The Daily Show earlier this week, there was an immediate outpouring of support. But the love-fest quickly soured when screen grabs of a few of his past, offensive, tweets were circulated online. Jon Ronson, author of the new book So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed weighs in on the scandal. 

Listen to the full show or click read more for individual segments.

Flickr/Jason Howle

 

A 14-year-old bullying victim is speaking out against a proposal that would prohibit New Hampshire schools from accessing students' social media accounts.

Souhegan High School freshman Jonathan Petersen told the Senate Education Committee on Tuesday that the bill would prevent schools from fully investigating bullying allegations. He described an incident in which two girls snapped inappropriate pictures of him, and he joined other critics in urging lawmakers to amend the bill to include an exception for investigations.

jeffrey james pacres via flickr Creative Commons / flic.kr/p/62168f

Once relegated to fanzines and the occasional bookstore, “fan fiction” is quickly becoming more accessible, more mainstream, and in some cases, more of a headache for authors who inspired the fans in the first place. On today’s show, why some authors are bucking against the trend.

Then, the days of the charity 5k may be over. Despite an improving economy, many of the biggest charity races are reporting drops in participation and funds raised. We’ll find out why adventure races like Tough Mudder may be to blame.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments. 

Koshy Koshy | Sea Turtle via flickr Creative Commons / Birds: flic.kr/p/cdLdas | Bees: flic.kr/p/dgg8w4

Social media sites are teeming with sexual imagery, jokes, and questionable content. Yet their official policies prevent sex-ed organizations from crafting a message that might actually resonate with the people who need it.

On today’s show, are social media sites censoring sex-ed?  Plus, our series Good Gig continues with a lighting pro who’s illuminated everything from Olympic ceremonies to Super Bowl half-time shows.  

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

House To Vote On Students' Social Media Privacy

Mar 1, 2015
Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 On Wednesday the New Hampshire House will vote on whether schools should be able to compel students to disclose their social media activity.

The bill bans schools from demanding access to a student’s user name and password or requiring students to “friend” school officials on Facebook.

It would apply to private and public schools, K through colleges and universities. Prime Sponsor, Merrimack Rep Katherine Rogers says schools that demand access to a student’s social media accounts without a search warrant are denying that student the civil right to privacy.

When it comes to Twitter followers, Katy Perry, Justin Beiber, and President Obama hold the top spots. On today’s show: we veer off social media’s beaten path to share some hidden gems in the Twittersphere.

Then, the holidays are here! Time for family gatherings, and perhaps, some awkward conversations. We’ll tackle the art of conversation, and offers tips on how to get a good one started with anyone, anywhere.

Plus, what happens when a pro-wrestler abandons the ring for Santa’s sleigh? One of our favorites segments of 2014.

Listen to the full show and click Read more for individual segments.

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