Slavery | New Hampshire Public Radio

Slavery

How well do you really know George Washington? If you’re picturing wooden teeth and a cherry tree, you will want to tune in for NHPR reporter Casey McDermott's conversation with historians Alexis Coe and Erica Armstrong Dunbar. Their work challenges conventional wisdom about this founding father and brings to the forefront Ona Judge, the runaway enslaved person he pursued to Portsmouth, N.H..

Air date: Tuesday, Dec. 29, 2020. Originally aired June 24, 2020

Jason Moon / NHPR

Gatherings were held across New Hampshire Friday to read aloud Frederick Douglass' 1852 speech in which he famously asks, "what to the slave is the 4th of July?"

In Manchester’s Veterans Park, about a dozen people took turns reading sections of the speech at a somber ceremony.

Re-examining American History & American Icons

Jun 28, 2020

How well do you really know George Washington? If you’re picturing wooden teeth and a cherry tree, you will want to tune in for a conversation with historians Alexis Coe and Erica Armstrong Dunbar. Their work challenges conventional wisdom about this founding father and the runaway slave he pursued to Portsmouth, N.H. Recent topplings of Confederate statues have prompted a national conversation about other American leaders who were not a part of the Confederacy but who owned slaves, such as George Washington and Thomas Jefferson. NHPR Reporter Casey McDermott hosts.

Air date: Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Teaching Slavery In Schools In N.H. And Nationally

Oct 24, 2019

Across the country, we're having more conversations about how slavery is taught in our schools, and the importance of understanding slavery for contextualizing the rest of our nation's history. How do students learn about slavery, and what are the gaps, challenges, and effective curriculums?

Original air date: Thursday, October 24, 2019. 

Unsung: Ona Judge

Apr 3, 2019

Ona Judge isn’t a household name. Perhaps, in part, because she exemplifies our nation’s shameful past. Judge was Martha Washington’s slave -- her personal handmaid. For most of the 1790s, the President and his family lived in the nation’s capital of Philadelphia. Ona Judge occupied a room over the kitchen. 

That is, until dinnertime on May 21st, 1796, when she stepped outside and never looked back. Two days later, an ad appeared in the Philadelphia Gazette offering a ten dollar reward for her return.  

 

Britta Greene / NHPR

Descendants of a former slave and Revolutionary War veteran buried in a small cemetery in Plainfield will gather there this weekend, alongside descendants of a family who enslaved him. Together, they'll commemorate a new headstone for the man, Derrick Oxford. 

37 INK

Enslaved to George Washington, Judge escaped to New Hampshire during Washington's presidency. She was relentlessly pursed by Washington, who sought to regain what he thought of as his property. Decades later, she revealed her story as one of the few early female fugitives. We sit down with the author of a new book on Judge's life. 

This show originally aired on March 2, 2017. 


click-see via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/V62An

From the solitary writer to the reclusive painter, loneliness is a rich vein for artists. Today, Olivia Laing meditates on her own bouts of loneliness, what it has meant to the world's great creative minds and why such an essential human experience cannot be wholly worthless.

Then, a historian on what ads seeking the capture of runaway slaves reveal about the identity, character and lives of runaways. 

Portsmouth African Burying Ground Commemorates Past

Jan 4, 2014
African Burying Ground NH

During the 1700's, many Portsmouth residents were of African descent– some slave, some free— and were buried in a segregated cemetery. That cemetery was built over, its boundaries obscured. A public works crew rediscovered the site and now the restoration of its dignity has begun. Kelvin Edwards is working on the Portsmouth African Burying Ground Memorial.

Portsmouth African Burying Ground Commemorates Past

Jul 6, 2013
African Burying Ground NH

During the 1700's, many Portsmouth residents were of African descent– some slave, some free— and were buried in a segregated cemetery. That cemetery was built over, its boundaries obscured. A public works crew rediscovered the site and now the restoration of its dignity has begun. Kelvin Edwards is working on the Portsmouth African Burying Ground Memorial.