slam poetry | New Hampshire Public Radio

slam poetry

A young black woman, smiling and wearing a yellow shirt, speaks into a microphone
Library of Congress/Public Domain

The performance of inaugural poet Amanda Gorman during last week's swearing in ceremony of President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris was a call for unity - for, as Gorman put it, "bridges" not "blades." We talk with a panel of poets about that moment, about why certain poems stay with us, about why the art of poetry matters - and how it is evolving.

Air date: Jan. 27, 2021

Whomst Among Us Dare Speak Ill of Poetry?

Apr 27, 2018

While April is National Poetry Month, it's also the time of year when some people whisper among themselves that the form is "really not for me". On this week's show we'll ask a couple of local wordsmiths how to make poetry more accessible.

And, as the ghost of William Shakespeare enjoys renewed interest every April, one local man gets down to brass tacks - was Shakespeare a plagiarist?

4.20.17: MONIFF, Poetry Slam, & Tana French

Apr 20, 2017
Kenneth Lu via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/2Hq1XJ

On today's show: 

New Hampshire Poets Set Sights On National 'Slam'

Aug 9, 2013
photo: Brady Carlson, NHPR

Each week, at a club in Manchester called Milly's, some of the region's top poets take the stage for what's known as a slam. 

Next week some of the poets who take part in Slam Free Or Die head to Boston, as a team, to compete in the National Poetry Slam.

Mark Palos is Slam Free Or Die's SlamMaster, and a member/coach of the team heading to Boston. He gives All Things Considered host Brady Carlson a preview of the 2013 team.