Sexual Harassment

NHPR Staff

A new legal filing outlines how the terms of a class action lawsuit would play out on the Dartmouth campus.

Last month, nine plaintiffs and Dartmouth College reached a $14 million settlement.

The women in the lawsuit alleged that Dartmouth administrators failed to properly protect students from harassment and assault by three former members of the school’s neuroscience faculty.

NHPR Staff

After more than a week of mediation, Dartmouth College and the plaintiffs in the Title IX class-action lawsuit have reached a settlement.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

 

Starting next year, sexual harassment complaints against New Hampshire lawmakers will be handled by an independent investigator.

Currently, complaints are reported to the House or Senate chiefs of staff.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu says Planet Fitness CEO Chris Rondeau remains a “pinnacle” of the state’s business community, even as Rondeau faces accusations that he helped create a hostile work environment for female employees of the Hampton-based company.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

 

The New Hampshire Legislature is one step closer to holding independent investigations into sexual harassment complaints against lawmakers.

Currently, complaints are reported to the House or Senate chiefs of staff. Under a bill the House passed on Wednesday, complaints would go to an independent human resources employee instead.

Supporters say sexual harassment is a real and continuing problem in workplaces, including the Statehouse. Opponents say administrative policy shouldn't be enshrined in state law.

NHPR

  Nearly 300 Dartmouth College alumni, students and professors are demanding the college drop its opposition to the use of pseudonyms by women suing the school for allegedly mishandling sexual abuse complaints.

 

The statement was also signed by Congresswoman Annie Kuster and state Senator Martha Hennessey, both of whom say they were assaulted when they were undergraduate students at Dartmouth.

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth College is challenging the anonymity of plaintiffs in a $70 million class-action lawsuit that claims the school mishandled sexual abuse complaints for years.

Dartmouth argues the use of pseudonyms for two recently added plaintiffs will make it unfairly difficult for the college to defend itself.

The lawsuit, filed last fall, centers around three former members of the school’s neuroscience faculty. Plaintiffs argue Dartmouth administrators failed to properly protect students from harassment and assault by the men.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Last year, New Hampshire House leadership had trouble getting state representatives to even acknowledge the institution’s anti-harassment policies — let alone attend training on the issue

But on Wednesday, about 100 legislators – or a quarter of the 400-member House of Representatives – showed up for just such a training session developed by the Council of State Governments and designed specifically for members of the New Hampshire legislature.  

Britta Greene / New Hampshire Public Radio

Two additional women have joined a $70 million class-action lawsuit against Dartmouth College stemming from allegations of sexual misconduct and assault in the school’s prestigious Psychological and Brain Sciences Department.

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth College is joining dozens of schools across the country in a new effort to address sexual harassment in collaboration with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

Dan Tuohy / NHPR

Senate Democrats are leading an effort to change how complaints of harassment and discrimination involving lawmakers are addressed in the State House, by establishing a new human resources officer who would be responsible for investigating those allegations.

Courtesy UNH

A new study out from UNH's Carsey School of Public Policy finds that more than half of women in New Hampshire report being victims of some form of sexual harassment in the workplace. That compares with 22 percent of men.

 

“I think our results fall in line with other national studies that have been conducted recently, showing high prevalence of sexual harassment in the workplace,” says Kristin Smith, research professor at UNH and co-author of the study.  

 

Allison Quantz for NHPR

In a court filing Tuesday, Dartmouth College strongly defended its response to allegations of discrimination and sexual violence in its prestigious Psychological and Brain Sciences Department.

The college is fighting a federal class-action lawsuit brought by seven current and former students. The plaintiffs are seeking $70 million in damages, arguing college administrators failed to take meaningful action to protect female students from physical and professional harm.

Allison Quantz for NHPR

Dartmouth College today detailed a new plan to combat sexual harassment and violence, an effort first announced last month. 

Casey McDermott, NHPR

Anti-harassment training has been offered at the State House for years — but it hasn't always been well-attended.

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth President Phil Hanlon is promising a “sweeping plan” to combat sexual assault following outcry from students, faculty and alumni over charges laid out in a recent federal lawsuit.

The complaint, filed Nov. 15, details years of alleged harassment and assault by tenured members of Dartmouth’s prestigious psychology faculty, claiming school administrators effectively ignored illegal behavior for years.

Tipped Off

Nov 17, 2018

When it comes to restaurants, most folks think about celebrity chefs, newly-opened spots or the latest food trends. But what do we know about the people that work within them? On today's show, we're looking inside the service industry, and specifically, the practice of tipping. And we'll try to answer the question: what type of culture does tipping create? 

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Bedford State Senator and Republican Congressional Candidate Andy Sanborn has declined to clarify what, exactly, he said to a Senate intern in 2013 that later prompted New Hampshire Senate leaders to bring in an outside law firm to review the situation.

Now, the comment has been revealed for the first time in newly released testimony from the senate’s legal counsel, who says he overheard the statement firsthand.

NHPR File Photo

Bill Kelley, the final of three Dartmouth College psychology professors facing allegations of sexual harassment and discrimination, has resigned.

Britta Greene / NHPR

In early 2002, Jennifer Groh, then a junior faculty member in Dartmouth's psychology department, had lunch with two of her female colleagues. They shared a disturbing story.

The weekend before, they told Groh, at a graduate student recruiting event at a local bar, a professor in their department had groped one of his students. 

NHPR Staff

Paul Whalen, one of three Dartmouth psychology professors accused of sexual misconduct, has resigned. He’s the second of the men to leave his position in light of the school’s investigation into their behavior.

Todd Heatherton, a former department chair who’d been on the faculty for more than two decades, stepped down earlier this month.

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth’s newly formed chapter of the American Association of University Professors is responding to the first disciplinary action taken by the college against three psychology professors under criminal investigation for sexual misconduct.

Gavel
SalFalko, Mentus Media / Flickr Creative Commons

A former employee for the Town of Londonderry says she was the target of discrimination and harassment, and claims reports of sexual misconduct went unanswered by town officials.

In a lawsuit filed in federal court this week, the former employee, who held jobs with the town’s assessing and planning departments, alleges that she was the target of bullying and harassment by supervisors and co-workers.

Chester Irons' relationship with St. Paul’s School didn’t always feel so complicated.

He’s in his 60s now, yet he can still remember the exhilarating feeling of being dropped off at the Concord boarding school for the first time.

"I stepped out of the car with my parents and said goodbye to them and ran off with a bunch of friends I met literally 20 minutes earlier. It was a new beginning, a new adventure and I was very excited," he recalled in a recent phone interview.

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

A review of sexual harassment and misconduct complaints against lawmakers across the country shows a half dozen New Hampshire House members faced allegations in the last few years.

The Associated Press filed records requests in every state seeking information on complaints made since 2008. The New Hampshire House provided information about eight complaints involving six members, but it only had records dating back to 2015. The Senate said it had no records of such complaints.

David Folkenflik joins us as part of our Justice & Journalism series with UNH Law School. We talk about the vast changes in journalism he's seen in recent years, from the impact of social media, to "fake news," to covering the #MeToo movement, including at NPR. 

In the months since #MeToo went viral on social media, millions of people across the globe have broken the silence on their stories of sexual assault and harassment. But where do we stand in New Hampshire? How has the Granite State responded to the Me Too movement? What conversations are we having? What actions are we taking?

Allegra Boverman for NHPR

Gov. Chris Sununu says he wouldn’t have a problem with requiring state lawmakers to undergo anti-harassment training, at least in theory.

NHPR Staff

Dartmouth College is close to completing sexual misconduct investigations into three of the school’s psychology professors. The professors – Paul Whalen, Bill Kelley and Todd Heatherton – have been on leave with restricted access to campus since last fall.

Depending on the findings of the investigations, the school will soon consider disciplinary action where appropriate, President Phil Hanlon wrote in an email to students, faculty and staff Monday.

Casey McDermott, NHPR

When it comes to getting lawmakers to take sexual harassment seriously, State House officials have said they only have so much control — that there's no rule forcing legislators to read the institution’s policy on harassment, let alone attend workshops on the issue. An anti-harassment training session held several weeks ago drew a turnout of only about 10 percent.

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