seacoast science center

Rye Police

Rescuers in Rye safely moved a young seal that made its way onto Route 1A during a high tide Friday morning.

Marine mammal rescuers at the Seacoast Science Center helped get the gray seal pup out of harm’s way near Rye Harbor while local police directed traffic around him.

Rescuers say they've seen this weanling a couple times in the past few days, at beaches in Hampton. He's thought to be about six weeks old and still figuring out life away from his mother.

NOAA

 

The University of New Hampshire is partnering with the Seacoast Science Center to help determine what is causing the deaths of seals and other marine mammals found along the northern New England seacoast.

The university's Veterinary Diagnostic Lab traditionally has focused on agricultural animals, but has expanded to include wildlife species over the last decade.

Virginia State Parks via NOAA

Scientists have narrowed down the top likely cause of more than 1,400 seal deaths across New England in recent months.

But they say the "unusual mortality event" appears to be ending as cold weather sets in.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says the main pathogen found in the stranded seals was phocine distemper virus.

It commonly affects seals and could affect pets, but can't be transferred to humans.

NH Seagrant

Scientists at UNH want the public’s help to search for invasive green crabs this spring and summer.

The second year of the monitoring project starts this Saturday.

New Hampshire Sea Grant biologist Gabby Bradt wants to find hotspots of green crabs, and determine when they molt, on the coast.

“And the reason for that is I'm really interested in figuring out when we can harvest soft shell crabs for a fishery and for a seafood market,” she says.

National Marine Life Center

A young harp seal who spent a month recuperating after getting stranded on Hampton Beach will be released on Sunday.

It’s only the second time the Seacoast Science Center has helped release a seal in New Hampshire waters.

The year-old seal is named Merrimack, or Mack for short. He was found on Hampton Beach on Valentine's Day.

Seacoast Science Center marketing director Karen Provazza says Mack was alert and chatty, but also seemed sick and confused.

Harp seals are born on ice in Canada and like to eat snow, but Mack was eating sand off the beach.