Salamanders

Courtesy Juliana Spahr (www.scivisuals.com; IG - @science_visuals)

So much of New Hampshire’s natural beauty is obvious; from the top of a mountain trail, from the shore of a lake or pond, even from your kitchen window. You barely have to open your eyes to see it. But take a closer look, and beauty gives way to scientific wonder. That wonder may be inspired by the boiling of watery maple sap to sweet liquid sunshine; or by the majesty of an osprey wresting a writhing fish from a river. But keep an ear out this spring and you may witness wonder on molecular level!

There's only one place in the world that you can find the axolotl—the Mexican salamander—in the wild. This creature is the living embodiment of the Aztec god of heavenly fire, of lightning and the underworld.But the wild axolotl’s fate might be bound to the Aztecs by more than myth in a story from Outside/In.

Then, the Executive Council. What is it? Why do we have it? And what does it do?

Brett Amy Thelen / Harris Center for Conservation Education

Frogs and salamanders in Keene got a vote of confidence from the City Council Thursday night.

Officials unanimously approved a plan to close a local road for a few nights this spring to let migrating amphibians cross in safety.