Racial Injustice | New Hampshire Public Radio

Racial Injustice

PBS

In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, racial injustice protests, and political uncertainy, many Americans are feeling anxious, overwhelmed, and lonely. Meanwhile, many of us are grappling with financial pressure while balancing work from home with all of our other responsibilities. We begin a new three-part series, called Taking A Toll, about the mental health impacts of the past year.  We discuss solutions and resources to help you make it through this difficult time. 

Air date: Wednesday, Feb. 17, 2021. 

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: September 18, 2020

Sep 18, 2020

Smoke from West Coast wildfires has dimmed our sunshine - could we see extensive fire damage here, and what’s the link to climate change? The New Hampshire Supreme Court heard oral arguments this week in a case that will decide if a list containing the names of more than 250 law enforcement officers with credibility issues should be disclosed to the public. We also find out about inconsistencies in psychological evaluations used in the hiring process at N.H. police departments. We find out about a demonstration at Cathedral Ledge in the Mt. Washington valley. And what will leaf-peeping be like this this fall?

 

Air date: Friday, Sept. 18, 2020. 

Dan Tuohy/NHPR

People of color and women have experienced higher unemployment than whites and men during the COVID-19 pandemic, and women of color and Latina immigrants have the highest jobless rates, according to new research by UNH’s Carsey School of Public Policy.

Christina Phillips

More than 1,000 students and alumni from Concord High School are asking officials to condemn racism in the school district.  

Sarah Gibson/NHPR

Activists from local Black Lives Matter chapters and other social justice groups from across the state gathered outside the New Hampshire State House on Saturday, calling for an end to systemic racism, white supremacy and police brutality.

The event — billed as a Day of Action and organized largely by young people — included poetry, song and calls for justice for Black Americans killed by police officers. 

George Floyd struggled desperately to make himself heard during his arrest. With a Minneapolis police officer's knee planted on his neck for more than 8 minutes, he pleaded for help, said he couldn't breathe — and finally, fell silent.

On Wednesday, more than three weeks after Floyd's killing, his brother raised a voice on his behalf in a message to international diplomats.