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protests

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 12, 2020

Jun 11, 2020

We look at how protests of racial injustice and debates over transparency on police procedures are playing out in New Hampshire. For the second time in history, the New Hampshire House meets somewhere other than the State House. The Executive Council nixes Governor Sununu's nomination for the state Board of Education. And the Secretary of State's Select Committee on 2020 Emergency Election Support outlines recommendations for voting this year.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

After initially being denied bail by a lower court, Daniel Zeron, 19, will be released on personal recognizance pending trial after a Superior Court judge heard his appeal. 

Zeron was arrested last Monday and charged with criminal threatening for allegedly posting a message on Facebook encouraging people to riot in Manchester. 

Christina Phillips/NHPR

As protests against racism and police brutality continue across the country and New Hampshire, we compare what we’re seeing now to earlier movements – more than a century of demonstrations for civil rights and against systemic racism. 

Air date: Tuesday, June 9, 2020. 

ALLEGRA BOVERMAN FOR NHPR

We sit down with Congressman Chris Pappas, a Democrat representing the state's 1st District. We catch up on the congressional response to the coronavirus pandemic, in terms of public health and the economy, and hear his response to the racial injustice protests here in New Hampshire.

Air date: Thursday, June 4, 2020. 

A 19-year old Ashland resident has been arrested and charged with criminal threatening for allegedly posting messages on Facebook encouraging protesters to tip over police cars in Manchester.

Daniel Zeron was detained early Tuesday morning, according to Manchester police, after he allegedly made the social media post from inside of a house in Ashland.

Ben Kremer / NH Youth Movement

Protesters gathered outside the Strafford County detention center in Dover on Saturday to call for the release of undocumented immigrants and asylum seekers, held at the facility under a federal contract, to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Annie Ropeik / NHPR

Climate activists are facing new charges after appearing in district court in Concord Friday.

They’ve held a series of protests against a coal power plant in Bow that’s the largest left in New England.

Dozens of activists crowded outside the Concord courtroom Friday. Many wore red – not just for Valentine's Day, but to show solidarity, they said.

Todd Bookman/NHPR

Two very different groups took to the State House on Wednesday. The first called for the impeachment of President Donald Trump, while the second was decked out in ‘Make America Great Again’ T-shirts. 

Neither side, however, appeared to be drawing many people to their cause. 

After the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, people in this region are looking more closely at local racist and anti-Semitic groups: their statements, their plans, and what may happen next.  We'll talk about those issues and gauge the overall New Hampshire reaction to what happened this weekend. 


Nicholas Wilson via Flickr CC / https://flic.kr/p/dSBvrk

Since Election Day, reports of hate crimes have soared across the nation. While well-documented in the news and on social media, the real numbers could be even higher. Today: why reporting and tracking hate crimes begins - and sometimes ends - with local cops, courts and cultural norms.

Also today, the Feds contemplate a scary scenario: an asteroid hurtling towards greater Los Angeles. We'll speak with NASA's planetary defense officer about teaming up with FEMA, the Air Force and other government agencies for a simulation of what could happen if an asteroid crashed into a densely populated region - and how they'd respond. 

Joe Topichak / Flickr/CC

This supermarket standoff has attracted national attention for its unlikely coalition of customers, workers, managers, and suppliers organizing against top executives, while traditional unions have been on the sidelines. We're looking at how these events fit into the changing landscape of organized labor, and where unions may be headed next.

  GUESTS:

Software Reveals The True Story Behind Citizen Videos

Jul 15, 2013
morteza bahmani via Flickr Creative Commons

Egyptian troops fired on supporters of ousted president Mohamed Morsi in Cairo last week. In June, anti-government protests in Turkey were broken up by what the Council of Europe deemed to be excessive force. In Brazil, weeks of demonstrations climaxed on June 21, when millions spilled onto the streets in more than 100 cities. More than 180,000 citizen-made videos captured the throngs in Brazil alone and some were uploaded to support charges of undue police violence made by Amnesty International and other civil rights groups. As amateur media grows increasingly integrated into protest coverage, software developed by researchers at the University of California at Berkeley could support and protect activists against unjust persecution. Called the “Rashomon Project,” the program synchronizes films taken from multiple angles to creating a complete timeline that could to be used as evidence of abuse during human rights trials. Ken Goldberg is professor of engineering at UC Berkeley and leader of the Rashomon Project, and he spoke with us about the project.

"Eh" Tu, Quebec?

Jun 7, 2012
(Photo by Philip Miresco via BoingBoing)

Prolonged protests over student tuition hikes came to a head late last month in Quebec, when more than 500 demonstrators were arrested in a single night. Protestors have twice paralyzed Montreal’s subway system, and vandalized buildings. US coverage of the quebec protests has been scant.