plane crash

Aviation Museum

On a stormy night in October, 1968, a Northeast Airplanes passenger plane crashed into Moose Mountain in Hanover. Tomorrow, the Aviation Museum of New Hampshire will host a program commemorating the 50th anniversary of what remains New Hampshire’s deadliest plane crash. NHPR’s Sean Hurley reports.

The Director of the Aviation Museum, Jeff Rapsis, has a personal connection to Northeast Airlines Flight 946. "One of the people in the crash was the pilot," he says, "who was my father John Rapsis."

A small plane crashed into the Connecticut River in Haverhill, N.H., on Sunday, injuring two, the New Hampshire State Police reports.

The plane, described as an amphibious experimental aircraft, was attempting to land on the river when it crashed at about 12:36 p.m.

Police said the pilot and passenger were injured: One was flown to Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, and in stable condition Sunday night, while the other was taken by ambulance to Cottage Hospital in Woodsville.

The pilot of a small, ultralight plane that crashed near the Weirs Beach Channel in New Hampshire's lakes region has died.

The plane went down Saturday afternoon on a lawn next to the channel.

The Laconia Police Department said Sunday that the pilot, 69-year-old William Panuski of Sanbornton, died of injuries he suffered in the crash. He was the only person in the plane.

The circumstances surrounding the crash are still under investigation. It occurred at the edge of Lake Winnipesaukee's western shore near Laconia.

Update 3:50 PM:

Federal investigators say an initial probe shows the small plane that crashed shortly after takeoff in New Hampshire had no obvious mechanical failures before it fell from the sky, killing two people.

Todd Gunther of the National Transportation Safety Board says witness accounts indicate the Cessna pitched up sharply after take-off on Monday at Hampton Airfield, rolled to the left then plummeted into trees.

Sam Evans-Brown, NHPR

Two people are dead after their plane crashed alongside Interstate 93 in Hooksett.

NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown was on the scene earlier today. He tells All Things Considered host Brady Carlson about what police have confirmed about the Doris and Herman Hassenger, the people killed in the crash, and about the plane's history.

The Mystery of the Arm in the Ice

Dec 20, 2011
(Photo by Johan Wieland via Flickr Creative Commons)

In 1948, a plane crash in a remote Alaskan mountain range killed everyone on board …twenty-four merchant mariners returning to the US from Shanghai, and six Northwest Airlines crew members. The crash site was quickly covered by snow and eventually entombed in ice…where it remained until 1999. It was then that a pair of former US Airforce pilots turned their hobby of solving forgotten aviation mysteries into an investigation.