Pests & Invasive Species | New Hampshire Public Radio

Pests & Invasive Species

Jerry and Marcy Monkman / Trust For Public Lands

The state is out with a draft 10-year plan for managing its forests, with a new focus on recreation and climate change impacts. 

The Division of Forests and Lands updates this plan every decade. The new 2020 draft plan is out for public comment until Oct. 15.

Sam Evans-Brown / NHPR

Environmental groups want federal regulators to reconsider a new water discharge permit for New England’s largest coal-fired power plant – Merrimack Station in Bow.

The Environmental Protection Agency permit was issued in May after many years of delay.

It dictates how the power plant uses water from the Merrimack River – burning coal to heat the water into steam that generates electricity, before putting that hot water back into the river.

CDC.gov

New Hampshire is reporting its first case of mosquito-borne illness for 2020. A Loudon resident was hospitalized and is now recovering from Jamestown Canyon Virus.

Stuart Meek; Wikimedia Commons

House lawmakers worked on a bill Monday that would require more insurance coverage for tick-borne disease testing – focusing on more than just Lyme disease.

The bill comes from Rep. Megan Murray, a first-term Democrat from Amherst. 

CREDIT FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS | MARK FOWLER

Every other Friday on Morning Edition NHPR’s Sam Evans-Brown tracks down answers to questions about the environment and outdoors for our listeners in a segment we call “Ask Sam.”

Pam asks: Thank you for your article about the swimming squirrels. It made me wonder about all of the mice that are coming into our house and our rental, and wondered if you can explain why so many of our friends are finding mice already coming into their homes.  

This might seem like a simple question to answer, but there are layers here, people!

The Eastern grey squirrel is a ubiquitous rodent in our area, and increasingly this fall, roadkill. We take them for granted; they've become a frequent topic of conversation mostly due to the notable number of carcasses on the roads. We take a moment to learn about the little creature we live in close proximity to, and find out why they are so plentiful this year and how they fit into the natural world and our environment.

Later in the hour, we get an update on the state's fight to protect the ash tree against the Emerald Ash Borer.

Via Youtube (Link to video in the story)

About 30 people gathered at the Urban Forestry Center in Portsmouth on Thursday to learn more an invasive species known as jumping, or snake, worms. 

Many of the gardeners wanted to know: how do we get rid of them?

Via Youtube (Link to video in the story)

A new species of invasive worm is chewing up forests and gardens on the New Hampshire Seacoast.

Experts will talk on Thursday in Portsmouth about how to deal with the wriggling pest called the jumping or crazy worm.

This Asian species looks like a regular earthworm, but Emma Erler, the education center program coordinator for UNH Extension, says you'll know the difference when you pick up a jumping worm.

What Are Japanese Beetles Good For?

Jul 25, 2014
Kurt Andreas via flickr Creative Commons

Mid-summer brings Japanese beetles to the garden, clustering on their favorite foods: the leaves of raspberry, grape, and garden roses. In the vegetable garden, the lead shoots of pole beans are another tasty target. I know gardeners who find a daily ritual of flicking beetles into a container with water and a drop of liquid soap to be very therapeutic. Beetle demise is quick. These are people who typically release indoor spiders and wasps to the outdoors, but damage to the garden is another matter. 

Gardening Tips For Granite Staters

Jun 10, 2014
Rebecca Makowski / Flickr/CC

It’s a short season, but one that many in New England enthusiastically embrace, whether on community plots, backyard gardens or on a commercial scale.  And now, in addition to the usual challenges, there’s climate change with a longer growing season but also new floral and faunal pests, and the possibility of extreme weather.

GUESTS:

Flikr Creative Commons / MJIphotos

The Emerald Ash Borer, an invasive Asian beetle that has killed millions of Ash trees in the Great Lakes region, is creeping closer to New Hampshire.

This week an Emerald Ash Borer infestation was found in the Berkshires in Western Massachusetts. The pest has spread from Michigan, through the Mid-Atlantic region, to upstate New York and Connecticut.

Kyle Lombard with the division of Forested Lands says, on its own the ash borer moves very slowly.

Threats to forest health from three exotic insect pests including Hemlock Wooly Adelgid, Asian Longhorn Beetle and Emerald Ash Borer loom large over the vast forests of NH. The veritable insect rogues gallery is at our doorstep after killing trees in nearby states.

Fear of the Beetle

May 10, 2012

New Hampshire foresters are closely watching the movements of an exotic beetle known as the Emerald Ash Borer.  Just last month the U-S Forest Service announced that for the first time, the beetle has been found east of the Hudson river.  That’s just ninety miles from the New Hampshire border.  The Emerald Ash Borer first appeared in North America ten years ago, and has killed millions of ash trees in several mid-Atlantic and Midwestern states, as well as Canada.  To find out whether or not the beetle poses a threat to the Granite State, we turn to Kyle Lombard.  He’s the Forest Health Prog