parole board

Via Dartmouth College

Governor Chris Sununu has named a former district court judge who also worked as a prosecutor and public defender to lead New Hampshire's adult parole board.

Jennifer Sargent joined the parole board last month. On January 15, she'll succeed former House Speaker Donna Sytek as its chair.

The board typically meets a few days each month and holds close to 2000 individual hearings a year.

In a statement, Sununu said he was confident Sargent's varied experience will "help usher in a new era at the Parole Board."

"Supervision" And Life On Parole

Jun 10, 2019
Sara Plourde; NHPR

The four-part podcast Supervision follows one New Hampshire man's life on parole. We talk about this series with reporter Emily Corwin, and discuss parole in N.H., including finding access to resources like housing, transportation, and mental health services, to finding a job and integrating back into life outside of prison.

Weekly N.H. News Roundup: June 15, 2018

Jun 15, 2018

The state parole board wrestles with public access to hearings.  A V.A. task force issues recommendations for improving N.H. veterans' health care.  And several property-poor districts consider suing the state over its education-funding mechanism.     

Sununu Vetoes Controversial Change To Parole Rules

Apr 2, 2018
Credit mikecogh via Flickr Creative Commons

Governor Chris Sununu has vetoed a bill relating to prison sentences for those struggling with substance abuse.

In New Hampshire, if a prisoner is out on parole but has that parole revoked, he or she must be recommitted for at least 90 days. The parole board has some flexibility in handing down those sentences, though.

Adam D. via Flickr Creative Commons / https://flic.kr/p/UnziBL

On today's show: 

Emily Corwin / NHPR

The New Hampshire parole board plays a key role in the state’s criminal justice system. Its nine members decide which inmates get out on parole, and which parolees return to prison. Although parole hearings are open to the public, they take place with little oversight or public scrutiny. And, unlike most legal proceedings, they can be surprisingly unrefined affairs.