p320

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A proposed class action lawsuit against Newington-based gun manufacturer SIG Sauer has cleared a key procedural hurdle. In an order issued Monday, a federal court judge ruled against the company’s motion to dismiss.

Derick Ortiz of Snowflake, Arizona filed a proposed class action suit last September alleging the P320 pistol he purchased for approximately $500 could inadvertently discharge when dropped, due to an alleged design flaw.

In his lawsuit, Ortiz says he wouldn’t have purchased a P320, or would have paid less, had he been aware of the drop fire issue. 

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Lawyers for SIG Sauer told a federal court judge in Concord Monday that a proposed class action lawsuit concerning the company’s popular P320 pistol should be dismissed because the plaintiff wasn’t harmed by the weapon.

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New Hampshire gunmaker SIG Sauer is facing another proposed class action lawsuit over claims its popular P320 pistol can inadvertently fire without a trigger pull.

In a complaint filed in federal court in Concord, Derek Ortiz, an Arizona gun owner, alleges that SIG Sauer’s model P320 pistol contains a design flaw that allows it to discharge when dropped, and that the Newington-based company continued to sell the flawed gun to the public after discovering its potential for malfunction.

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Newington-based SIG Sauer is settling a personal injury lawsuit with a law enforcement officer in Virginia who suffered serious leg wounds after she alleges her pistol discharged without a trigger pull.

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SIG Sauer is asking a federal court judge in Texas to dismiss a proposed class action lawsuit that centers on the safety of its popular P320 pistol, arguing that the weapon is safe.

The lawsuit, which was filed by Dante Gordon of Katy, Texas, claims SIG Sauer knowingly sold hundreds of thousands of pistols that could fire when dropped. In court papers filed Tuesday, the Newington-based gunmaker denies that “there is a drop fire defect,” and argues that the suit should be denied class action status because it is “improperly overbroad.”