Outside/In

BRICKY CEMENT / FLICKR/CC

The Outside/In team demystifies cap-and-trade programs in the Northeast.

The Executive Council is a peculiar New Hampshire institution made up of five “citizen” councilors that, together with the governor, make up the executive branch. Why do we have one? And how does it work?

 

Then, overpopulation was one of the biggest environmental issues of the 60s and 70s, arguably bigger than saving the whales, planting trees, and acid rain. But then it seemed to disappear from the conversation.

What's That Sound?

May 17, 2019

When workers at the American embassy Cuba claimed to have been attacked by a mysterious weapon that left no trace, it led to a major shift in American diplomacy toward the Caribbean socialist state. But the story has also led to a split in journalism, stemming from the sources different kinds of journalists rely on. Today, a story of weapons, nature, and truth from Outside/In.

Civics 101: New Hampshire, our local look at how state government works, brings us a look at the governor. Not our current governor specifically, but the office of the governor itself. What does the NH state governor do? And what makes our governor position different than in other states?

Then, a thought experiment: How fast could people go before the combustion engine and other technologies drastically increased the speed of the human race? And how did they pull it off?

There's only one place in the world that you can find the axolotl—the Mexican salamander—in the wild. This creature is the living embodiment of the Aztec god of heavenly fire, of lightning and the underworld.But the wild axolotl’s fate might be bound to the Aztecs by more than myth in a story from Outside/In.

Then, the Executive Council. What is it? Why do we have it? And what does it do?

The Complicated History Of The Overpopulation Debate

Nov 27, 2018
Sara Plourde; NHPR

Population growth has been a concern for environmentalists, and other interest groups, for more than a century. But the anxiety over the loss of space, and resources, as a result of human growth and consumption, is not simple. We talk with Sam Evans-Brown, host of Outside/In, NHPR's podcast about the natural world and how we use it, about his two-part show on the history of the anxiety of overpopulation. 

Listen to the episodes of Outside/In on overpopulation here


You're Family Now

Nov 23, 2018

In June 1981, a bodybuilder, a stockbroker, and 10 other men entered the woods of New Hampshire to settle an argument. They called it "The First Annual Survival Game," and the details are the stuff of legend... even if they aren't all true. Then, what happens to your leaves after you rake them up and put them on the curb? And another story in our continuing series on vanity plates, this one a story far more complex than a license plate can capture.

Sara Plourde; NHPR

We sit down with Taylor Quimby, senior producer of Outside/In, NHPR's show about the natural world and how we use it, to talk about the latest episode, "The Meat Matrix." In the episode, Quimby spent time with a listener who gives frequent feedback to the station about her vegan advocacy; he also explored the world of vegan activism and what some call "the meat matrix." Listen to the episode of Outside/In here

Seeing Double

Nov 9, 2018
Jacqui Helbert

Today on Word of Mouth, we're digging in to the fraught relationship between the gear industry and gender with Outside/In. When do women actually need something different and when are companies just looking to make more money by selling women a product that is essentially the same thing... but smaller and pink? And what do you do if the available products - pink or not -  don't fit your body at all?

In today's episode, we're talking about getting in too deep and surviving. First, storm chasing burst onto the pop-culture scene in the 90s with the box-office hit Twister. But the hobby is more active today than ever before and more dangerous, too. And then, the business that can helicopter, air-lift and rescue their clients from dangerous adventures and vacations - for the right price. 

In today's episode, we're talking about species that thrive... and some that don't. First, an American lobster discovered in European waters raises some important questions: is it invasive or just non-native? Then the story of two birds: one universally reviled and the other an avian celebrity. 

There are different kinds of lobster… you know this, right? You’ve seen Blue Planet.

Outside/In: 'Raw Water' Trends

Jun 18, 2018

In this week's episode, stories of magical thinking. First, what's better - the tap you know, or the roadside spring you don't? We dig into the "raw water" trend, and sample some springs around the state. Then, you can throw a Christmas wreath in the bin, but that doesn't mean it's going to get recycled; we'll investigate how changes to the international waste trade, and our habit of 'wishful recycling' might just land more of our goods in the landfill. Then we make Sam ruin some of our favorite stuff for the sake of environmentalism. 

We kick off the summer season with NHPR's Outside/In.  First, sharing the road between bikes and cars, and one cyclists's war against bike lanes.  Then, an american lobster in Stockholm. Is Scandinavia is in the midst of a foreign lobster invasion?

The Future of Recycling with Outside/In

Apr 18, 2018
Kristian Bjornard; Flickr

Many towns across New Hampshire have adopted single-stream recycling... toss everything together, and it will be sorted out down the line. But a recent episode of NHPR's Outside/In found that this method of collection is becoming less sustainable and less profitable. We look at how this is impacting the Granite State.

Listen to the full episode of Outside/In: "One Bin To Rule Them All."

In the mid-19th century, the country was in the throes of a widespread religious revival. It was called the Second Great Awakening, and it fostered the founding of new denominations and inspired millions of converts. This movement laid the groundwork for Methodists and Baptists to exponentially in number, and for Joseph Smith to establish his church of Latter Day Saints.

An NHPR series that examined the complicated history of clean energy in the province of Quebec and its impact on energy planning in New England is the winner of a prestigious award for international journalism.

CONCORD, NH – The environmental benefits and human costs of clean energy; corporate power dynamics; and the treatment of native peoples are the weighty issues examined in a new, groundbreaking series of reports from New Hampshire Public Radio, starting Thursday, November 9.

Healing Hands of Nature: Wilderness Therapy

Jul 21, 2017
Pexels

Wilderness Therapy is a form of treatment that uses the natural world and wilderness settings to address behavioral and mental health issues in teens. With a history dating back to the nation’s earliest summer camps, the idea of nature as healer has deep roots. But with a tattered history of institutional abuse, patchwork oversight, and absent legislation, is this treatment option too wild to be trusted?  We partner with NHPR's Outside/In to explores these issues.


Outside/In: S03|E05

May 5, 2017

In this week's episode, talking about death is never an easy conversation, but as today's episode reveals, people have a lot of questions about what happens to their body once they die. We'll look into the trend of a more natural approach to burial and why it's trickier than it seems. We'll also find answers to a few questions from the team about funerary practices. Plus, Taylor and Sam head to the lakes region to sample wine made from an invasive species. 

Outside/In: S03|E04

Apr 27, 2017

In this week's episode, we look into the wonderful world of nature documentaries and find that truth behind the lens and the microphone is sometimes hard to find. Also, a heartwarming story from our podcasting friends in Montana, HumaNature, about a man who set out on a long journey with his trusty sidekick who just happens to be a donkey.

Outside/In: S03|E03

Apr 21, 2017

In this week's episode we look into the long history of beavers in North America and why we humans seem to always be in conflict with them. Plus when did skiing get so fancy? And can Sam teach show producers who've never skied how fun it is to careen down a mountain on two planks?

Outside/In: S03|E02

Apr 14, 2017

In this week's episode, solar power is all the rage these days, but how did it get its start? And what the heck is net-metering? Also we'll hear about the resurgence of a deadly form of black lung in coal country and why, despite the severity of these health hazards, it's not getting a lot of attention.

Outside/In: S03|E01

Apr 7, 2017
Photo: Logan Shannon

In this week's episode we follow the trail of a very secretive pioneer in eco-activism, look into the long history of the relationship between science and politics including the bizarre Doomsday clock, and Sam answers some listener's questions about spring tails, wind, and Mount Mitchell.

Outside/In: Ties That Bind

Nov 18, 2016

For alpinist Ben Clark, scaling the world’s toughest mountains is a source of pride and peace; for his mom and dad it is a source of constant worry. What's a parent to do if their son’s lifelong ambition puts him in harm’s way?

Plus, The “Save the Whales” movement of the 1970’s was instrumental in putting a stop to commercial whaling. But even as humpbacks and other whale populations have bounced back, one species is still up against the ropes. Literally. Later in the show, Sam tackles the problem of whale entanglement and discovers that proposed solutions include crossbows, Australian lobsters, and Chinese finger traps.

Outside/In: There's No "i" in Team

Nov 11, 2016

When you walk a trail in the woods, have you ever wondered, how did this get here? Who carved this path? Chances are a team of hardscrabble men and women worked tirelessly to make sure the paths you follow blend right into the landscape. This week we find out why one such trail crew, known as the 'TFC', is the stuff of legend.

Also, running and completing a marathon is an amazing achievement that is the culmination of many hours of hard mental and physical training. But can you really claim you finished when you collapse just a few yards from the finish, or is that cheating.

And we'll finish it off with a heartwarming story of the ultimate gesture of sportsmanship from a place called Ushuaia, Argentina known as the "End of the World". 

Outside/In: Fighting the Odds

Nov 4, 2016

In this week's episode, we have two stories about people fighting and overcoming tough odds: First, the tale of Tony Bosco, who camped in the woods around Rutgers University for more than two decades. Second, the life and work of Dr. Percy Julian, a pioneering chemist who helped unlock the secrets of the soybean and change the face of modern medicine.

Outside/In: Go Big or Go Home

Oct 28, 2016

In this week's episode, the rise and fall of the Keene Pumpkin Festival, a quaint New England tradition that took a dark turn when riots broke out during the 2014 festival. Plus, the calmest extreme sport you'll ever witness: bird-watching. 

Sam answers a listener question about some rather nefarious crows and we travel to the most glamorous outdoor spot you've likely never noticed and discover it is teeming with microscopic life.

Outside/In: Take the Reins

Oct 21, 2016

In this week’s episode, we look at a controversial method of wildlife management called biocontrol. Then we practice a little biocontrol of our own by cooking and eating an invasive fish that’s terrorizing the ocean, and finally we set sail with just the sun, the stars, and our long lost sense of direction to guide us.

Outside/In: Stake Your Claim

May 20, 2016

There used to be a time when you could strike out into the vast unexplored wilderness and stake your claim – but not anymore.  Today, the story of one seaside town where one homeowner is facing a brutal property dispute against an undefeatable opponent: the Atlantic Ocean.  

Plus, a group of 19th century pioneers lay claim to one of the world’s most inhospitable mountains and turn it into a premiere tourist destination. 

And, Sam goes on a hunt for Earth’s last unexplored places, so he can plant a flag and stake his claim.

Outside/In: Living Fossils

May 20, 2016
Greta Rybus and Logan Shannon

Technology advances at breakneck speed, so why hasn’t the electric grid changed in 60 years? This week’s episode explores  things, that for one reason or another, haven’t changed in a very, very long time. Like the ginkgo tree, which has remained strong--and smelly--for over 250 million years.

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