Occupational Safety and Health Administration

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A wood-burning power plant in Springfield could face more than $125,000 in federal fines after a worker died on the job last November.

The federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration found that a 23-year-old plant employee died after being pulled into a conveyor.

Inspectors found a lack of safety guarding on that conveyor and other machinery. And they say employees weren’t trained to keep equipment from accidentally turning on.

In a statement, officials say the worker’s death was a tragedy the plant’s owner could have prevented.

Two recent incidents have brought the number of work related deaths in New Hampshire this year to at least ten.

Last Sunday, a 35 year old Epsom man was killed when a tree he was harvesting fell on him. On Monday, a 23 year old from Loudon died in a work-related incident at a wood-burning energy plant. Both cases are being investigated by OSHA.

Brian Mitchell is with the New Hampshire Coalition for Occupational Safety and Health. He says that while the total number of workplace deaths in the state is down from recent years, the number isn’t low enough.

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A Westinghouse plant in Newington New Hampshire is facing $82,000 in fines for workplace safety violations.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has cited Westinghouse Electric for allegedly exposing workers to hexavalent chromium at its stainless steel component manufacturing facility in Newington.

In response to a complaint, an OSHA inspection found that employees performing welding work were exposed to airborne concentrations of the carcinogen in excess of permissible limits.

Hexavalent chromium can cause damage to eyes and skin upon contact.